Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    West Kentucky
    Posts
    19

    Chiller for making ice!?

    On the welcome forum there is a thread about an engineer saying he works at an ice rink and they use chillers for making the rink ice. I am only a little versed in chillers. I have dealt with some in conditioning space. I wonder if someone here could clear this up for me. Is this a water cooled condensor type situation or what? All the chillers I have dealt with run the water through the evaporator to absorb the heat from the air. How would it work in making ice?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Down by the river
    Posts
    1,673
    we use glycol so we can chill the water below freezing, it's still a separate process loop, not the frozen product.

    We also in many aplications for cooling we build ice in special fields and when we have high cooling load demands the chilled water loop runs through the ice banks to knock the load off the chillers.

    there 2 scenarios of ''making ice''. lack of detail but a good idea of it for you.
    It's hard to stop a Trane. but I have made one helluva living keeping them going.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    7,326
    if you mix your water with glycol, you dont freeze at 32 degrees in the loop this is also true of mixing it with calcium chloride. so, in process cooling, including ice rinks, ice storage, and other low temp applications, it is possible to run temps much lower than thirty two degrees.

    in an ice rink, for example, typically the fluid running through the piping system is somehere around fifteen degrees f. this makes for a floor temp of somewhere around 18-22 degrees.

    in process work, it is not uncommon to go below zero. for example, last year we did a machine that ran at minus twenty leaving fluid temp. this was used in a pharmaceutical application.

    In many operating suites, the docs now want to run the rooms down to sixty degrees or so. to do this, many systems now utilize recool systems, which is a cooling coil downsteam of the typical cooling coil. most of these run glycol around 34-36 degrees, just above freezing, to prevent icing of the coil, yet allowing leaving air temps in the low forties.

    these are just a few examples uaed in real world today. so long as the chiller is designed properly, and the fluid has proper protection, it really isnt such a big deal.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Central WA
    Posts
    1,602
    Quote Originally Posted by gourdhead View Post
    On the welcome forum there is a thread about an engineer saying he works at an ice rink and they use chillers for making the rink ice. I am only a little versed in chillers. I have dealt with some in conditioning space. I wonder if someone here could clear this up for me. Is this a water cooled condensor type situation or what? All the chillers I have dealt with run the water through the evaporator to absorb the heat from the air. How would it work in making ice?
    Think again about what you are saying... The chillers you have dealt with actually run water through the evaporator to remove heat from the water. The chilled water runs through coils in air handlers to remove heat from the air.

    At an ice rink the chilled glycol or brine runs through piping in the floor to remove heat from the concrete. The cold floor is flooded with water which freezes.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    The Hot South
    Posts
    1,354
    I think he has mistakingly referred to the chilled water coil in the air handler as the "evaporator".

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event