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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,739

    AEROSEAL duct sealing - who dunit, what results??

    I'm hearing more and more about this solution. It sounds pretty amazing. Unfortunately nobody within 150 miles performs this service. So I've never seen a system this was performed on.

    Homeowner comments may help me either encourage someone local or jump in myself. So anyone who has comfort and/or energy savings results to share, it would be much appreciated.
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,253
    ted,

    If you have not already done so you may find some info if you search this board for Aeroseal and former board member dash. He was an Aeroseal dealer and posted about it frequently.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    south louisiana
    Posts
    3,233
    wasn't aeroseal bought by Carrier?
    seems I remember the last independent aeroseal guy locally
    before you needed to be a Carrier dealer to provide the
    aeroseal product.
    is that a regional or national thing?
    The cure of the part should not be attempted without the cure of the whole. ~Plato

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Altmar, New York, United States
    Posts
    4,791
    so how does this work? is it a spray on sealant?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    south louisiana
    Posts
    3,233
    spray thru ductwork sealant. seals some cracks/gaps internally
    The cure of the part should not be attempted without the cure of the whole. ~Plato

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,739
    Quote Originally Posted by snupytcb View Post
    so how does this work? is it a spray on sealant?
    Unclear to you? You aren't alone.

    This is my very limited picture:

    You seal supplies and returns and pressurize ductwork, injecting some type of atomized plastic that precipitates out of suspension as it leaves ductwork, building upon itself and eventually sealing cracks and holes. Since most leakage is seams and corners, you get amazing reduction numbers which result in instantaneous comfort results.
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Altmar, New York, United States
    Posts
    4,791
    it seals the inside? is this something that can be done after installation? i am interested.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,739
    Quote Originally Posted by snupytcb View Post
    it seals the inside? is this something that can be done after installation? i am interested.
    No Doubt! Sounds too good to be real, doesn't it? Hal Smith was the first one I learned about it from.

    Unfortunately 4U, TAG has it. Apparently Ft Drum paid him to do a couple thousand homes at the base.
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Altmar, New York, United States
    Posts
    4,791
    damn the big companies. they get all the cool toys.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    phoenix
    Posts
    73
    I have not had the aeroseal done at my house, but my neighbor did. We both have the very same house, built a the same time. I suspect that like everything else in the hvac industry, the installer is the key.

    I did watch the neighbors pre-sales inspection, the installation and the post testing. What I am about to say, is based only on my observations.

    The initial leak testing was done with all registers in place. A plastic film was placed over the registers to seal them. I noticed that the sealing did not extend to the register/wall interface. The house is over 25 years old and I can tell you, from my home, that the original 1/4 inch open cell foam register/wall gaskets have all turned to dust and provide no sealing. As witnessed by the dust streaks on the neighbors walls around each register. Additionally, the drywall to duct interface at each register was originally done, again my opinion, by a beaver with bad teeth!!!. In my home and my neighbors home, the register flanges barely cover the gap between drywall and the ducts/nailing flange!!.

    Prior to the installation of the aeroseal, all registers were removed and caulking/mastic applied to the drywall and duct interface by the aeroseal installer. The ducts (now without registers, were then re-sealed with tape and plastic on the inside of the ducts. Then the aeroseal product was installed.

    After the aeroseal was installed, the ducts were rechecked for leakage, without the registers in place, but with the plastic and tape in the ducts. The amount of leakage, was way way down in comparison to the original test. I believe that the installer advised that the estimated duct leakage, after the installation of the aeroseal, was down to 5 percent. I do not recall exactly, what the original estimated leakage was, but I believe that it was around 30 percent. Once the registers were re-installed, no further testing was done.

    The neighbor also, from this same company, at the same time, had new dual pane windows, a solar hot water system and a new set back thermostat installed.

    Again, these are just my observations of one company and one installation.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,739
    RB, any comfort or other observations from the neighbor?
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    phoenix
    Posts
    73
    in a word.... NO, but with a explanation.

    First off the neighbor did not see any decrease in energy used over the last year.

    The windows that were installed were indeed dual pane low e, vinyl windows, but the way they were installed was really bad. The installers bent up aluminum flashing into a "U" shape. The aluminum was then attached inside the window opening and the windows were then inserted into the "U". Caulk and gavity held in the windows. From what I have seen, all caulked seams have failed. The aluminum flashing was not insulated. I have seen first hand the aluminum be the same temperature on the inside, as the ambiant temprature was outdoors. 4 of the windows were arched. The gaskets between the two panes of glass, on all the archs, have failed and fallen in, thus no seal . The installing sub contractor has gone out of business.

    The solar hot water system was installed with a plastic open air collector on the roof and plastic piping to the water system inside the house. Both have leaked, due to splits and cracks. A second hot water tank was installed next to and in conjunction with the original tank. No over flow was installed on the second tank. Additionally, no permits were pulled. Inspectors have red tagged the solar system.

    None of the real duct work issues, like the flex duct, were addressed. The neighbors system is currently running around 1.2 iwc ESP. The air flow calculations that I did for the neighbor (no hood used). Appear to Show that the 5 ton system is moving abour 900 cfm into the house, with a delta t of about 25 to 35 degrees, depending outside and attic temps.

    so, did the aeroseal work, I dont know!!! there are so many duct work design issues that were not corrected that I dont think anyone will ever know. Additionally, I think that the testing, before and after the aeroseal, was conducted incorrectly. So who knows...

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    Quote Originally Posted by rbelisle1 View Post
    The initial leak testing was done with all registers in place. A plastic film was placed over the registers to seal them. I noticed that the sealing did not extend to the register/wall interface. The house is over 25 years old and I can tell you, from my home, that the original 1/4 inch open cell foam register/wall gaskets have all turned to dust and provide no sealing. As witnessed by the dust streaks on the neighbors walls around each register. Additionally, the drywall to duct interface at each register was originally done, again my opinion, by a beaver with bad teeth!!!. In my home and my neighbors home, the register flanges barely cover the gap between drywall and the ducts/nailing flange!!.

    Prior to the installation of the aeroseal, all registers were removed and caulking/mastic applied to the drywall and duct interface by the aeroseal installer. The ducts (now without registers, were then re-sealed with tape and plastic on the inside of the ducts. Then the aeroseal product was installed.

    After the aeroseal was installed, the ducts were rechecked for leakage, without the registers in place, but with the plastic and tape in the ducts. The amount of leakage, was way way down in comparison to the original test. I believe that the installer advised that the estimated duct leakage, after the installation of the aeroseal, was down to 5 percent. I do not recall exactly, what the original estimated leakage was, but I believe that it was around 30 percent. Once the registers were re-installed, no further testing was done.
    Quote Originally Posted by rbelisle1 View Post
    None of the real duct work issues, like the flex duct, were addressed. The neighbors system is currently running around 1.2 iwc ESP. The air flow calculations that I did for the neighbor (no hood used). Appear to Show that the 5 ton system is moving abour 900 cfm into the house, with a delta t of about 25 to 35 degrees, depending outside and attic temps.

    so, did the aeroseal work, I dont know!!! there are so many duct work design issues that were not corrected that I dont think anyone will ever know. Additionally, I think that the testing, before and after the aeroseal, was conducted incorrectly. So who knows...
    A major sealing improvement just by changing the location of the testing equipment...


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