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  1. #53
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    6,247
    Originally posted by trane
    The suction of a blower (like a vacuum cleaner) is what allows us to pressurize a building with outside air. If the blower did not have this suction capability there would be no need to run outside air ducts.

    Same thing as a HRV/ERV needing to be balanced due to having 2 seperate blowers.
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  2. #54
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,944
    Whatever you want to believe guys.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  3. #55
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Philadelphia Pa.
    Posts
    461
    OK from only a homeowner. Perhaps what is meant is that the primary purpose of the blower motor is to blow the air. It is designed to do this. It is not designed to suck air.

    However when returns are present this allows some of the air along with some of the air that was blown into the room to flow back into the return which just happens to be at the other side of the blower, so a loop is being made by this design

    Like I said in my previous post when I closed the supply duct no air flowed into the return grill near the ceiling, but as soon as I opened the supply, I could feel air flow at the return. It is like the supply air was pushing the room air into the grill and not like the blower was sucking the air from the room.

    last word from me on this cause I am over my head.

  4. #56
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    sacramento calif.
    Posts
    1,187
    ive seen a flex duct return or two "sucked" flat behind a dirty electrostatic filter.

  5. #57

    Re: Re: Really....

    Originally posted by Carnak
    Originally posted by AllTemp
    [
    If you cannot have to much return then why will a motor over amp with the blower door off Robo ?
    It would over amp because it is moving too much air. It was at an RPM suitable for more static.

    I knew that I was just being an ass :-)
    AllTemp Heating & Cooling

  6. #58
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Originally posted by Carnak
    In both cases above, atmospheric pressure pushes the water into the pump inlet.

    Well,I don't have a well,but I do have a pump that is between 3 to 8 feet above the river,depending on the tide.

    I can tell you that atomospheric pressure doesn't get the water to the inlet of the pump,but it's self priming(sounds like suction),and it works just fine for the sprinkler system.


    Now I've had a well ,water table at around 10 'below ground,meaning when the well is open,that's how high the water will rise.Priming may be required,but I don't see atomopheric pressure moving the water to an above ground pump.

  7. #59
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    922

    Return

    Just putting it out for comments

    Every forced air and every forced water water system should be balanced. What happens is people start adding returns and adding extra room supplies for additions, renovations, and they never balance the system. Then some poor mechanic comes along and repairs and/or replaces something and then everyone would like to know why it does not do what it should do or why does it run so long or it comes on and then shuts down then comes back on again? The amount of return air and/or water affect the amount of supply air and/or water and that affects the temperature supply. When is the last time anyone has seen a residential home receive a proper balance?


  8. #60
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Chattanooga, TN
    Posts
    13
    Long Answers paragraphs after paragraph...try,
    What goes into the fan "100 %" Will come out of the
    fan "100%" Window Units dont have any returns, small
    apartment have little return attached, yet they work perfectly
    a little noisey but work.

    So in concluding...If enough is going in ...it will come out..the only question ...is where.

  9. #61
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    The ESP of the duct system at various points in the return and supply show how the static is being used to deliver and return air,ther's nothing there that shows the return side being assisted by the supply side .

    [Edited by dash on 11-28-2005 at 05:28 PM]

  10. #62
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    Originally posted by dash
    Originally posted by Carnak
    In both cases above, atmospheric pressure pushes the water into the pump inlet.

    Well,I don't have a well,but I do have a pump that is between 3 to 8 feet above the river,depending on the tide.

    I can tell you that atomospheric pressure doesn't get the water to the inlet of the pump,but it's self priming(sounds like suction),and it works just fine for the sprinkler system.


    Now I've had a well ,water table at around 10 'below ground,meaning when the well is open,that's how high the water will rise.Priming may be required,but I don't see atomopheric pressure moving the water to an above ground pump.
    Find a pure suction lift pump, not a jet pump, that can lift more the 34 feet.

    Next time you go out drinking, steal one of those test tubes from the shooter bar.

    Wash the test tube and fill it full with water. Cap it with your thumb. Turn it upside down and stand it up in a bowl of water. Does the water spill out of the test tube or do you have a column of water?

    A column of water will stand because the atmospheric pressure is pushing down on the water in the bowl but it is not pushing directly on the water in the test tube, it pushes on the test tube glass.

    Drill a hole in the dome of the test tube, the force of atmospheric pressure is equalized and gravity takes over.

    Wilma was on record as the most intense storm every, 882 millibars. The drop in atmospheric pressure in the eye alone would cause the sea water to get pushed up about four feet without even considering the effect of the wind.

    The pump inlet will make a low pressure, because it is lower than atmospheric, atmospheric pressure is pushing the water in.



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  11. #63
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    2,868

    Talking

    I don't know much about water pumps but I still say a blower sucks.

    [Edited by trane on 11-28-2005 at 05:55 PM]

  12. #64
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Originally posted by Carnak
    Originally posted by dash
    Originally posted by Carnak
    In both cases above, atmospheric pressure pushes the water into the pump inlet.

    Well,I don't have a well,but I do have a pump that is between 3 to 8 feet above the river,depending on the tide.

    I can tell you that atomospheric pressure doesn't get the water to the inlet of the pump,but it's self priming(sounds like suction),and it works just fine for the sprinkler system.


    Now I've had a well ,water table at around 10 'below ground,meaning when the well is open,that's how high the water will rise.Priming may be required,but I don't see atomopheric pressure moving the water to an above ground pump.
    Find a pure suction lift pump, not a jet pump, that can lift more the 34 feet.

    Next time you go out drinking, steal one of those test tubes from the shooter bar.

    Wash the test tube and fill it full with water. Cap it with your thumb. Turn it upside down and stand it up in a bowl of water. Does the water spill out of the test tube or do you have a column of water?

    A column of water will stand because the atmospheric pressure is pushing down on the water in the bowl but it is not pushing directly on the water in the test tube, it pushes on the test tube glass.

    Drill a hole in the dome of the test tube, the force of atmospheric pressure is equalized and gravity takes over.

    Wilma was on record as the most intense storm every, 882 millibars. The drop in atmospheric pressure in the eye alone would cause the sea water to get pushed up about four feet without even considering the effect of the wind.

    The pump inlet will make a low pressure, because it is lower than atmospheric, atmospheric pressure is pushing the water in.




    Are you saying airflow in a home is the same as your example of a pump?Or is more about "X" and some equalizeair thing???

  13. #65
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    6,247

    Re: Return

    Originally posted by propmanage
    When is the last time anyone has seen a residential home receive a proper balance?
    About two weeks ago.
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