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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    121
    I've read through some of the posts involving vent-free products. I've also visited the vent-free alliance website, http://www.ventfreealliance.org
    I'm curious as to everyone's input on using a vent-free heater as a backup in case of a power-outtage.

    We've had a few ice storms here in the midwest in the last few years, and it seems like having a heater that doesn't rely on electricity would make sense if you lose power for a few days.

    Are these types of heaters very common?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,761
    they are approved for use but i just do not like unvented appliances. however if installed properly and mantained it would be better than freezing. just have a good co detector and make sure to provide fresh air to area being used in. a better alternative would be a direct vent unit that needs no power.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,277

    Thumbs down lung vented

    All the testing was in vitro---not in vivo. You may not die but you can get sick and these numbers are not reported. They require maintenace, cannot be tampered with, and stink. Also, most people grossly oversize them.

    Once you're done reading the ventfree alliance's propaganda, try this one: http://www.aventlessfireplaceattorneyforyou.com Tells you all you need to know about the evils of VF, what your symptoms are even if you don't really have any and find a local attorney to sue the rotten bastards who installed that infernal device.

    Why not try a standing pilot or IPI gas direct vent fireplace and enjoy it even when the power is on? http://www.fireplaces.com
    HTH.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Vent free heaters are fine in older homes that are not very tight. They are downright dangerous in a tighter modern home.

    I wouldn't hesitate to keep one as a backup for when the power is out. It is critical to the health of you and your family that the there is a continuous supply of fresh air into the house while it is running, even if you have to open a window. A good low level CO detector would be in order too.

    I like Dearborn heaters. I had a couple of the infrared ones for a couple of years when I lived in a historic district a home that was built in 1919. IMO, the infrared ones are safer than the regular radient/convection ones.

    http://www.dearbornheater.com/CREST2.htm

    I had the Darborn DRS30T and DRS10T heaters. I ended up donating them during one of our local "Heat the Town" deals to replace some scary dangerous heaters I found in a mentally retarded guys house.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Posts
    996
    Why not just start the car and put a hose from the exhaust pipe into the house, you will get heat from that as well and be just about as safe as a vent free appliance. There is a reason they put a friggin chimney on gas appliances.
    "Go big or Go Home"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    121
    Thanks Mark, for the link to Dearborn. The infrared heaters seem like a much more viable option to heating the home in an emergency than the aforementioned car exhaust.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Just be sure to use common sense while using one.
    Keep a window or 2 cracked open in any rooms with a heater.
    Even though the cabinet doesn't get very hot on the infrared ones, don't set anyting on it or against it.
    leave LOTS of clearance in front of it. It will burn/melt anything that is to close to the front of it. I had one melt the plastic on a chair that I accedently left about 5 feet in front of of my 30k BTUH heater.
    Don't use anything bigger than the 6k or 10k BTUH ones in a bedroom, some codes only allow up to a 6k BTUH heater in a bedroom.

    The best location for an infrared space heater is in an inside corner or wall of the room, facing the center of the room and outside walls. This placement allows the entire room and outside walls to be warmed.
    They don't heat the air directly, the radient heat will warm all the walls and furnishings, wich will then transfere heat to the air.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

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