Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 26

Thread: Monster removal

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,158
    Check out that huge old Willie. 2 of everything in 1 cabinet. 2nd 1/2 of the furnace held off by outdoor stat til it gets cold. Old was 250K input, new is 125K!




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rochester, MN
    Posts
    5,304
    Oh wow.. That's HUGE! I never seen thse in person. Just saw it in my Dad's old sales book.

    Was this the gas saver model?


    How large was this home?? or bussiness?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Burleson, Texas
    Posts
    1,741
    Could you get that beast out in one piece or was it a cut and gut???

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,415
    Ohhhhh, it don't look that big... And I can say that since I didn't have to help carry it out lol

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    chicago suburbs
    Posts
    4,422
    my back hurts just looking at it.

    they must have built the house around that beast.
    FILL OUT YOUR PROFILE!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bartlett, IL
    Posts
    6,619
    Yep, that's a tank alright, I've had my fair share of removing those bastards, still plenty of them in operation though...


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    7,405
    Hey Bald, any pics of the heat exchanger on that thing? Just want to see how it compares to the one I just killed myself on getting it up the stairs.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    220
    i would think your wife would pack your lunch in something other than a mickey mouse lunch sack for pete sake!!...yeah, you TRIED to hide it in the first pic, but we all know......

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,158
    No shots of the heat exchangers. But they looked as clean and solid as the day they were made.

    May, it was a Gasaver. Older home, boss thinks he sold it 30 years ago. Back then the mentality was bigger is better obviously!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    the Great Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    607
    Why use radius heel elbows ?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,415
    Better air flow, less restriction, hopefully less turbulance thus a better straighter line through the filter causing better filtration.

    Oh, and they look cool too :-)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    Radius heel elbows at the equipment on the return side do absoluteley nothing for airflow. Equivalent length is exactly the same as a square throat / square heel combo. H/W=1 then that is 45 feet of duct. H/W=2 then that is 30 feet of duct. H= opening at furnace, W= narrow width of drop.

    Radius throat ells show little benefit until the throat is 1/2 the diameter of the drop (H/W).

    Correctly installed turning vanes are equivalent to 10 feet of duct- same as a radius ratio of 1:1.

    Reference velocity of 700 fpm @ .08" WG per 100' of duct. ACCA Manual D page A3-14.

    Might as well use square throat / square heel. Cheaper and faster to make than a radius heel.

    Or do it right with turning vanes.

    You will find that the bottom 1/3 of the filter will get loaded faster on a sysyem without vanes or the proper radius throat because all the air is going there. Filter restriction ratings are based on using the whole filter, not just part of it.

    Nice install otherwise.

    [Edited by neophytes serendipity on 11-25-2005 at 09:19 AM]
    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. It's unwise to pay too little.
    When you pay too much, you lose a little money -- that is all. When you pay too little, you may lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

    The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot -- it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."

    John Ruskin


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12
    Baldo, Glad to see that someone still knows how to do a PROFESSIONAL job. Those cheep shots about your ductwork, pay them no attention. Some people think that units installed with flat metal and screws are fine. Keep up the good "OLD SCHOOL" sheetmetal work.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event