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  1. #1

    converting baseboard heat to forced air

    Hello I've been thinking of converting my boiler system for last 5 years. Hot water baseboard heat in a 2600 sq ft house + 2600 in basement. I have no complaints about the heat except I did have a leak under the concrete floor in basement to the baseboard. i would like to refinish the basement. My concerns are possible additional leaks in the future and no AC in the basement and stagnet air in the basement. The 20 year old airhandler is in the attic and doesn't cool the house that well. Only one return in the whole house for AC. I know I want ac in the basement. So i was thinking of eliminating both systems for a forced air system. What does everyone think?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    568

    Confused

    Quote Originally Posted by josluc View Post
    Hello I've been thinking of converting my boiler system for last 5 years. Hot water baseboard heat in a 2600 sq ft house + 2600 in basement. I have no complaints about the heat except I did have a leak under the concrete floor in basement to the baseboard. i would like to refinish the basement. My concerns are possible additional leaks in the future and no AC in the basement and stagnet air in the basement. The 20 year old airhandler is in the attic and doesn't cool the house that well. Only one return in the whole house for AC. I know I want ac in the basement. So i was thinking of eliminating both systems for a forced air system. What does everyone think?
    i like base board heat, and then ducted a/c system, the reason forced air is popular is because it's less expensive. and you can add ac to it!imho forced warm air works good, in tight houses if not to drafty. best bet, is get some estimates and feel out the contractors about your options, they'll do a load calc on your house, and come up with a btu load, to determine how much a/c as well as heat your house would need!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,826
    Attached are 4 documents that can help take a lot of the risk out of soliciting companies to do the job. Each home/installation is unique and as such is a custom design. Finding the right company to do the design and installation is the major part of that challenge. Some opinions expressed on this site might try to gloss over or simplify the science that should be used on a job like yours but trust me, the laws of physics are very real and a poor choice on your part will do nothing to vary them. The outcome of the job and both your comfort and your health depend on having solid science involved in the process.

    That said, there are a number of solutions. First, find the right company. Get a load analysis and then decide on system options. Second, understand that trying to service multiple floors with one piece of equipment is generally best done using a zone controlled system. Such a system requires greater knowledge on the part of the designer to keep the system quiet, while still providing the anticipated comfort and improved indoor air quality.

    We do types of heating and AC and I can tell you that a properly designed and installed ducted system can deliver great heat, great cooling and far superior indoor air quality than can a forced water system. Good luck with your project, learn to depend on the science and not the opinions and you'll have a great outcome.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    You could install an air handler for the basement with a hydronic coil. It would give you air movement, you could add a HRV or add a return to the upstairs for fresh air, but keep you boiler and the radiant heat for now for hte upstairs. Maybe upgrade the attic air handler to a heat pump in the furture for a hybrid system.

    Most people say that radiant heat is still hard to beat on a really cold day.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    568

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by skippedover View Post
    Attached are 4 documents that can help take a lot of the risk out of soliciting companies to do the job. Each home/installation is unique and as such is a custom design. Finding the right company to do the design and installation is the major part of that challenge. Some opinions expressed on this site might try to gloss over or simplify the science that should be used on a job like yours but trust me, the laws of physics are very real and a poor choice on your part will do nothing to vary them. The outcome of the job and both your comfort and your health depend on having solid science involved in the process.

    That said, there are a number of solutions. First, find the right company. Get a load analysis and then decide on system options. Second, understand that trying to service multiple floors with one piece of equipment is generally best done using a zone controlled system. Such a system requires greater knowledge on the part of the designer to keep the system quiet, while still providing the anticipated comfort and improved indoor air quality.

    We do types of heating and AC and I can tell you that a properly designed and installed ducted system can deliver great heat, great cooling and far superior indoor air quality than can a forced water system. Good luck with your project, learn to depend on the science and not the opinions and you'll have a great outcome.
    good post!

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