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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Oakland, CA
    Posts
    54
    I replaced an old evaporator coil in a walk-in cooler. First I pumped down refrigerant, cut refrigerant lines, and removed old one. After install the new and welding lines, I need start again the unit, Do I need to do a vaccum before, just through the suction valve (becouse can't use valve on the receiver)?, or there is no problems if just run unit again?. Thanks for comments.

  2. #2
    Put the pump on with a micron gauge.

    I wish more 'techs' were better trained. Maybe some schooling.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Monmouth Junction-NJ-USA
    Posts
    5,997
    Unreal. If you can't spell vacuum, how can you know when to use it?????? That type of post is really scary.
    If you really know how it works, you have an execellent chance of fixin' er up!

    Tomorrow is promised to no one...

  4. #4
    everybody new gets picked on. Dont worry about it.


    Normally I would agreeeee that someone who dont know this question shouldnt be doing the work.
    But frankly, I have been with techs who HAD SCHOOLING and who KNEW BETTER and WERE TAUGHT CORRECT PROCEEDURES!!! And yet chose to do things the wrong way!!!


    I shared the story about the late night coil change-out in a meat case ... once I had the lines welded ... I asked the guy if he was gonna bring in his vacuum pump and "suck er down"?

    He said "no".

    When I pressed the matter ... he mentioned how he had opened the lines upstairs in the motor room and how the system was "open to the atmosphere" ...


    I mean ... we're talking about a TWELVE FOOT, HUNDRED AND FIFTY POUND EVAPORATOR HERE!!!
    And this guy wouldnt even purge it out ... much less vacuum it down!


    to say that guy knew better is an UNDERSTATEMENT!!! He simply didnt give a rip!


    It is not knowledge that separates a good mechanic from a bad one. It is not experience that differentiates a good mechanic from an excellant one. And training .. as much as we all talk about the value of it ... that too isnt the greatest factor in the makeup of who is good and who is a bad mechanic.

    Choices. Attitude. Respect. Discipline. Pride in what we do for the good of others.


    What makes the difference in how the job turns out is the guy who is doing the work must care about what they do!!!
    And those who care ask questions. And they're not ashamed to do so often. Even one's which some may consider elementry.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Monmouth Junction-NJ-USA
    Posts
    5,997
    It is still scary to know that there are peeps out in the field working without the knowledge, discipline and/or pride to not know or do the next right thing.
    If you really know how it works, you have an execellent chance of fixin' er up!

    Tomorrow is promised to no one...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Oakland, CA
    Posts
    54
    I asked for comments about a specific situation, and nobody say anything about it. I understand that someones are scary to share what they think are job secrets, and are very fast to make judgements about people working in what they consider their field. Poor of them......are blind to reality.
    Honestly, I don't care to say that am begginner in refrigeration job, but, believe it or not, I got school training. If I did that kind of questions is becouse what I have seen in the field, in "old technicians" whom think they know everything, is that a lot of times they do jobs in a way completely different to procedures learned in school. "Time is money" is a phrase very common in this kind of "technicians". I don't know you guys, but my idea was put something in discussion, of course, in my level, and I think that replace an evaporator coil is something for begginners. I'm sorry if i offended your intelectual level.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Monmouth Junction-NJ-USA
    Posts
    5,997
    It not a question of keeping secrets. After you have been here for a while you will understand that any tom dick or harry can come in here and ask for advice and we have no idea of his expertise (or lack of) in the refirgeration field. The to answer to your question in my opinion (not having seen the system or knowing the service vlave configuration) is (if the suction valve when front seated is open to the lines) would be to braze a tee in the liquid line with a schrader connection, change the LL line drier and pull vacuum from both suction line and liquid line.













    If you really know how it works, you have an execellent chance of fixin' er up!

    Tomorrow is promised to no one...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Yuba City, CA.
    Posts
    254
    I agree with rayr. Well not about all the down talking but on the vacuum solution. And thanks r12 for having integrity. You'll get harassed here if you ask questions that seem to be common knowlege. But don't get your feelings hurt. Just remember there is usually some seed of truth to what people say. Also use a good micron gauge, and change your drier.
    I will enter His gates with thanksgiving in my heart.

  9. #9
    Originally posted by josan6
    I asked for comments about a specific situation, and nobody say anything about it.
    I did. Read the first reply to your post. Then read the second sentence again and don't get butthurt about it. Aren't you taught why corrrect vacuum procedures are important?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    395

    Red face

    Dude 1st thing grow a set. We bust on each other here like it was a work site.If you look at any book on a/c or refrigeration pulling a vac is in all of them. If you look at any paper work inside the box its there as well.
    Tin Knockers BANG for a living

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    534
    Originally posted by josan6
    I asked for comments about a specific situation, and nobody say anything about it. I understand that someones are scary to share what they think are job secrets, and are very fast to make judgements about people working in what they consider their field. Poor of them......are blind to reality.
    Honestly, I don't care to say that am begginner in refrigeration job, but, believe it or not, I got school training. If I did that kind of questions is becouse what I have seen in the field, in "old technicians" whom think they know everything, is that a lot of times they do jobs in a way completely different to procedures learned in school. "Time is money" is a phrase very common in this kind of "technicians". I don't know you guys, but my idea was put something in discussion, of course, in my level, and I think that replace an evaporator coil is something for begginners. I'm sorry if i offended your intelectual level.
    First let me say if you went to school you should not be posting this type of question, with that said it's always a good Idea to evacuate when ever possible, all you need is a little moisture to cause big problems, with that said put it on pump and do it right!! Oh one more thing did you change the drier???

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Oakland, CA
    Posts
    54
    The thing is that I have a supervisor or "technical manager", one of that guys who think knows everything in refrigeration business, and when I suggest him replace filter drier, he said is not necessary, when I suggest him evacuate system, he said is not necessary. What can I do?, wait for results, that's it. Then, my idea to try get some opinions, based in people with experiences. I think my idea is very clear respect importance of eliminate humidity and non condensables in a refrigeration system, but, again, in my short experience in the field 've learned that some people work in different way. Technical knowledges and personal ethic are different things.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Monmouth Junction-NJ-USA
    Posts
    5,997
    Originally posted by josan6
    The thing is that I have a supervisor or "technical manager", one of that guys who think knows everything in refrigeration business, and when I suggest him replace filter drier, he said is not necessary, when I suggest him evacuate system, he said is not necessary. What can I do?, wait for results, that's it. Then, my idea to try get some opinions, based in people with experiences. I think my idea is very clear respect importance of eliminate humidity and non condensables in a refrigeration system, but, again, in my short experience in the field 've learned that some people work in different way. Technical knowledges and personal ethic are different things.

    Personally speaking,,,,, I would look for another job. You are not going to learn anything there and these kind of procedures are unethical and are going to come back and bite someone pretty damn hard.
    If you really know how it works, you have an execellent chance of fixin' er up!

    Tomorrow is promised to no one...

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