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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Winter Haven, FL
    Posts
    3,586
    No, the EPA cannot go after you for venting this substance. The EPA has scantioned this substance to be dispersed into the atmosphere. But they could take your license fir venting a known. Hfc.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    81
    152-A main component is Ethane and I would be more concerned with an contacting an open flame than ODP(which is zero). Google it and read the warnings

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    81
    1,1-Difluoroethane is an organofluorine compound with the chemical formula C2H4F2. This colorless gas is used as a refrigerant, where it is often listed as R-152a or HFC-152a. As an alternative to chlorofluorocarbons, it has an ozone depletion potential of zero, a lower global warming potential (120) and a shorter atmospheric lifetime (1.4 years)[2]. It has recently been approved for use in automobile applications as an alternative to R-134a.

    Contents [hide]
    1 Production
    2 Uses
    3 Safety
    4 See also
    5 References


    [edit] Production1,1-Difluoroethane is produced by the mercury-catalyzed addition of hydrogen fluoride to acetylene:[3]

    HCCH + 2 HF → CH3CHF2
    The intermediate in this process is vinyl fluoride, the monomeric percursor to polyvinyl fluoride.

    [edit] UsesIn addition to serving as a refrigerant, 1,1-difluoroethane is also commonly used in gas duster (commonly thought of as "canned air"), and many consumer aerosol products, especially those subject to stringent VOC requirements.

    [edit] SafetyThe practice of huffing canned air can be extremely dangerous or fatal. The intentional inhalation of 1,1-difluoroethane caused a fatal cardiac arrhythmia in a 42 year-old man.[4] Several reports of fatal car crashes have been linked to drivers huffing 1,1-difluoroethane.[5][6]

    In a Du Pont study, rats were exposed to up to 25,000ppm (67,485 mg/m3) for six hours daily, five days a week for two years. This has become the NOAEL for this substance. Prolonged exposure to difluoroethane has been linked in humans to the development of coronary heart-disease and angina.[7]

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    34
    I think the difference is that in the canned air it is considered a deminimus vent, seeing as how it is only a few ounces. If you were to vent from a refrigeration system, that would not be deminimus. Goes along the same lines as oil. New refer oil is not hazourdous waste, until it is mixed with refrigerant

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Central WA
    Posts
    1,308
    In the can it is a propellant. In the refer system it is a refrigerant. The law says not to vent refrigerant.

    The sale and use of nitrous oxide is controlled, unless it is a propellant in whipped cream (you know you tried it in high school).

    Vanilla extract and hair spray are about 80 proof and a child can purchace them. Light beer is something like 3% alcohol but you have to be 21.

    It's all politics and money - nothing new.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    U.A. (upper Alabama)
    Posts
    787
    LOL! I'm dusting off my keyboard right now with a refrigerant hose and a drum of.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    U.A. (upper Alabama)
    Posts
    787
    Quote Originally Posted by DPinst View Post

    Prolonged exposure to difluoroethane has been linked in humans to the development of coronary heart-disease and angina.[7]
    That's it! I'm never huffing again, especially if it's going to give me heart disease or a vagina.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Cedar Rapids, IA
    Posts
    476
    Quote Originally Posted by hvac n-j-near View Post
    Excellent question, and the discussion shows just how stupid government regulations can be sometimes.

    If you charge a system with canned air and then vent it, ethically you have done nothing wrong other than “store” the canned air somewhere else for a while. However since you are EPA trained and certified you have committed not to release refrigerant to the atmosphere so technically you have violated the law. You could use the canned air on electronics since that is the manner it was intended.

    On the other hand a non certified person could spray the stuff everywhere, but cannot (legally) charge a refrigeration system with it since they are not certified to do that.

    So the issue is not so much ethics as it is a violation of the law the EPA has created.
    R12 was widely used as a solvent in industrial processes for cleaning. It was also used as a propellant for a chemical sterilizing agent in medical device manufacturing. As the hospital I worked for was quite concerned that they would no longer be able to use their gas sterilizers after the rules went into effect, we researched the impact of the law. Basically if it's used as a refrigerant then the no venting rules apply. If not then any product that uses it has to display a label saying this product was produced using chemicals that harm the ozone layer, or something to that effect. So by that interpretation once you put it into a refrigeration/AC system you are not allowed to vent it without recovering it.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    137
    That's funny the guy that was administering our cfc education, licensing testing and stuff many mooms ago was reluctant to educate us on how the epa and cfc licencenses were nothing more than a politcal bs scheme. He would mock the laws on refrigerant utilitilzing the fact that more pools, city water, industrial cooling tower additives and so on evaporate more chlorine into the air than if we vented everyone's central air into the atmosphere all at the same time. We took it with a grain of salt because we were so enthused about becoming certified and felt a sort of satisfaction of achievement by getting the license. But now we realize how stupid regulation is.
    The only decision in life is to decide what to do with the time given to you

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