* What area of learning is crucial in HVAC? * - Page 4
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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,584
    Electricity.
    Air flow.
    Vapor compression cycle.
    Combustion.
    Heat loss and gain.
    Principles of hydronics.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    17,708
    Physics.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  3. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    195

    I Offer A Slightly Different Perspective

    Quote Originally Posted by seanhoang View Post
    Man I thought I knew a few thing or two about HVAC, but ever since I got on to hvac-talk.com I know crap!!! Okay so here's the questions for ALL experts and pros:

    What three areas MUST I need to get good at in order to be successful in HVAC???

    There's so many things to learn, but I don't know where to start.

    Thanks for all advice.

    Mr. Seanhoang,

    You post has elicited a lot of great replies focusing on developing technical capabilities and a learning mindset. I am not allowed to touch the power tools and I come to our business from a different perspective but I would like answer your question as well.

    The residential HVAC business is down about 50% from 2005 and there is considerable downward pressure on prices. Big Box retailers, Sears, Utility owned contractors, Manufacturer owned contractors, large consolidated contractors, Internet Sales, and many other sophisticated marketers are stealing the best customers from small companies. Due to the fact that the vast majority of small HVAC companies come up from the technical side of the business, they are ill equipped to compete against these firms and in many cases don’t even know the Customers they are loosing.

    Three Areas:

    1. Marketing Systems - Small contractors are totally out matched on the Web. Referrals are great but the web is where your best customers are looking for information and looking for you.
    Companies that do not have an effective web presence get what is left after those that do get the good customers.
    Know what makes an effective Website. Understand what web metrics are and learn what the numbers mean. The vast majority of small companies have no web site or a bad website. Most who have bad websites have no idea just how bad they are. Many guys are actually hurting their business by creating negative first impressions with their sites. Get started with “Google Analytics”, understand the terms, Visits, Bounce Rates, Conversion Rates, and some of the other basics and you will be miles ahead of most. The Web is all about numbers and you can win here with a some effort.

    2. Sales Systems- Learn how to make your sales process “pulse” in Real Time. You have 10 minutes to contact a customer back once they have initiated contact with you. Learn how to interview the customer on the phone. Try to find out as much as you can about them before you just jump in your truck and waste your time. Learning how not to waste your time with losers is a primary skill. You need to spend your time with customers who value what you bring to the table. Develop a “Retail Mindset”

    The best salesman in our business are all about Confidence. They look their customer in the Eye, and tell them the truth. No BS, no tricks, no Dog and pony Show. They know the customer does not want(or have time) to watch them do their job. High End Customers do not have any time. High End customers are not impressed with your computer. High End customers expect you will do what is needed, regardless of what that is.

    The Customer will decide in about 2 seconds weather you know your stuff on not. Learn never to take your eye off the customer’s and always give straight answers. Your High End customers expect that you will do what is required to make them happy. Show your customer you are Confident in your ability to make them comfortable. You can win in this area!

    3. Business Systems- Due to the nature of HVAC many small guys come up through the technical side of the business and are challenged by the business stuff. At this point, many of your sophisticated competitors they are Businessmen fist HVAC guys second. Some guys never want to grow, for the ones that do, it is almost always the business skills that trip them up. Local colleges, Manufacturers, and your Suppliers are all great resources for your ongoing business education. Your HVAC partners have an interest in your success! They want to help you.


    I hope you find this perspective useful. The key to learning is to develop a “Beginner’s Mind” and always leave some room in your glass for new information. I have taught HVAC classes for a long while and I always get the guy in the front row that could teach the class I’m teaching. I’ll ask him “Why are you Here?” I always get the same answer, “You can always learn Something!”

    The HVAC business has been good to me, I hope it is good for you.

    Best of Luck,

    AC BAD DOG

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,695
    1. Internet marketing - don't forget search optimization, you want to be on the top of the first search page.

    2. Web site - I plan on an intake form they can complete before the phone call.

    3. Business management - Scalable CRM with automatic follow up steps. No paper files, no post it notes.
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    central Alabama
    Posts
    23
    My advice is very simple and all consuming--- remember the Golden Rule! This will guarantee that you will always be as properly prepared as possible when you undertake your different jobs. If you treat everyone as you want to be treated, then all will be well.

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Calgary, AB, Canada
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by AC Bad Dog View Post
    Mr. Seanhoang,

    You post has elicited a lot of great replies focusing on developing technical capabilities and a learning mindset. I am not allowed to touch the power tools and I come to our business from a different perspective but I would like answer your question as well.

    The residential HVAC business is down about 50% from 2005 and there is considerable downward pressure on prices. Big Box retailers, Sears, Utility owned contractors, Manufacturer owned contractors, large consolidated contractors, Internet Sales, and many other sophisticated marketers are stealing the best customers from small companies. Due to the fact that the vast majority of small HVAC companies come up from the technical side of the business, they are ill equipped to compete against these firms and in many cases don’t even know the Customers they are loosing.

    Three Areas:

    1. Marketing Systems - Small contractors are totally out matched on the Web. Referrals are great but the web is where your best customers are looking for information and looking for you.
    Companies that do not have an effective web presence get what is left after those that do get the good customers.
    Know what makes an effective Website. Understand what web metrics are and learn what the numbers mean. The vast majority of small companies have no web site or a bad website. Most who have bad websites have no idea just how bad they are. Many guys are actually hurting their business by creating negative first impressions with their sites. Get started with “Google Analytics”, understand the terms, Visits, Bounce Rates, Conversion Rates, and some of the other basics and you will be miles ahead of most. The Web is all about numbers and you can win here with a some effort.

    2. Sales Systems- Learn how to make your sales process “pulse” in Real Time. You have 10 minutes to contact a customer back once they have initiated contact with you. Learn how to interview the customer on the phone. Try to find out as much as you can about them before you just jump in your truck and waste your time. Learning how not to waste your time with losers is a primary skill. You need to spend your time with customers who value what you bring to the table. Develop a “Retail Mindset”

    The best salesman in our business are all about Confidence. They look their customer in the Eye, and tell them the truth. No BS, no tricks, no Dog and pony Show. They know the customer does not want(or have time) to watch them do their job. High End Customers do not have any time. High End customers are not impressed with your computer. High End customers expect you will do what is needed, regardless of what that is.

    The Customer will decide in about 2 seconds weather you know your stuff on not. Learn never to take your eye off the customer’s and always give straight answers. Your High End customers expect that you will do what is required to make them happy. Show your customer you are Confident in your ability to make them comfortable. You can win in this area!

    3. Business Systems- Due to the nature of HVAC many small guys come up through the technical side of the business and are challenged by the business stuff. At this point, many of your sophisticated competitors they are Businessmen fist HVAC guys second. Some guys never want to grow, for the ones that do, it is almost always the business skills that trip them up. Local colleges, Manufacturers, and your Suppliers are all great resources for your ongoing business education. Your HVAC partners have an interest in your success! They want to help you.


    I hope you find this perspective useful. The key to learning is to develop a “Beginner’s Mind” and always leave some room in your glass for new information. I have taught HVAC classes for a long while and I always get the guy in the front row that could teach the class I’m teaching. I’ll ask him “Why are you Here?” I always get the same answer, “You can always learn Something!”

    The HVAC business has been good to me, I hope it is good for you.

    Best of Luck,

    AC BAD DOG
    Well said and very true.

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    2,190

    With this recent post

    http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=160248

    How about some basic building knowledge (structure and science ) get added to the list
    You have got to learn from other people's mistakes! Because God knows you don't live long enough to make them all yourself !!!!!!!!

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wake Forest, NC
    Posts
    352
    If there was a part of HVAC that wasn't critical, it would not be a part of HVAC... So far as I know there are no parts or principles that serve no essential function on an HVAC system.
    It's not rocket-science...

    It's electromechanical thermodynamic engineering

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    929
    #1: You will never be able to stuff everything you need to know between your two ears. In other words, don't be afraid to ask for help from outside resources. This site, technical publications, OEM manuals, the techs at your local parts counter, etc.
    #2: There are always enough jobs out there to keep a good man busy. Don't waste any time holding up the competition. I don't have any competition, I only have friends in the same industry that work for others.
    #3: Treat all people with respect. Listen to your customers... they might not know anything about HVAC, but they know when their system is doing something different. Ask for a description.

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,695
    GEVANS, awesome post.

    #1 is so true for me. I'd add; surround yourself with really smart people, then you can get by being average smart. And you can worry less about brain explosion.
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  11. #50
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Northeast Missouri
    Posts
    61
    1. Airflow and waterflow. Often overlooked and misunderstood.
    2. It all begins with week one day one basics. Superheat, subcooling and the basics of electricity.
    3. Always have a good friend in the industry on speed dial. Cause you will need him and he will need you.

  12. #51
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Yuma, AZ
    Posts
    2,361
    I voted 5 stars for this thread.
    "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education."
    Mark Twain
    More at: http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/education/

  13. #52
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    17,708
    Along with the various subjects already mentioned, the key element is to approach each day with a hunger to learn something. Develop relationships to help you do that. We are detectives, and we sometimes need another opinion about the meaning of the clues we find. The great thing about this site and others like it is that you get to stand by and look over the shoulders of a wide variety of other people, and take in all of the situations and symptoms that others can every day. This will accelerate your growth. Good luck.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







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