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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    71

    Surge Protector for Furnace?

    I was thinking of replacing the furnace circuit breaker in my breaker box with one of the surge protector breakers below. Not sure if I should bother though because the protector is about $150. I will have 10 year parts and 10 years extended labor warranty on the new furnace. Does that warranty cover damage caused surges or lightening?

    http://www.stopsurges.com/SIEMENS-QS...15-QSA1515.htm

    Thanks,
    Clocker

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Emerald Coast
    Posts
    924
    .
    You can buy a one time surge protector ( single appliance) at the big box store for about
    1/20 th price.
    ..
    Do not attempt vast projects with
    half vast experience and ideas.
    ...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Zelienople, Pa
    Posts
    2,965
    Quote Originally Posted by Clocker View Post
    I was thinking of replacing the furnace circuit breaker in my breaker box with one of the surge protector breakers below. Not sure if I should bother though because the protector is about $150. I will have 10 year parts and 10 years extended labor warranty on the new furnace. Does that warranty cover damage caused surges or lightening?

    http://www.stopsurges.com/SIEMENS-QS...15-QSA1515.htm

    Thanks,
    Clocker
    I don't think any manufacturer warranty covers "acts of God"...
    How tall are you Private???!!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by Clocker View Post
    I was thinking of replacing the furnace circuit breaker in my breaker box with one of the surge protector breakers below.
    Your assumptions are based in popular myths. That protector is not protection for that one circuit. It does protection for everything inside the house - for all circuits.

    Another also posted nonsense that a protector between AC mains and electronics will stop surges. No protector does that. Not one. But that is what advertising says to 'educated' a public.

    Any protection that would work adjacent to a furnace is already inside that furnace. Your concern is a rare anomaly - typically once every seven years - that would overwhelm protection inside a furnace. And overwhelm protection already inside all appliances. That means a 'whole house' protector (such as the Siemens) that connects short (ie 'less than 10 feet') to earth. A surge earthed before entering a building does not go hunting for earth destructively via the furnace, stove, TV, or computer.

    Again, no protector does protection. That Siemens (or any protector) only work when connected low impedance (ie 'less than 10 feet') to single point earth ground. Protection means every single wire (telephone, TV cable, satellite dish, AC electric) in every incoming cable connects to earth. AC electric wires connect to earth only if you have installed a 'whole house' protector from Siemens or other equally responsible companies (GE, ABB, Intermatic, Square D, Cutler-Hammer, Leviton, Keison, etc).

    Not listed for many reasons is Panamax, APC, Belkin, Tripplite, or Monster. None have that dedicated wire for the always required connection to earth. None claim surge protection in numeric specs. All get promoted by urban myths promoted by advertising and hearsay.

    Best protection means a 'whole house' protector. Upgrading what always does the protection: single point earth ground. Your attention should be focused mostly on earthing. That protector is only simple science that costs maybe $1 per protected appliance. The art of protection is its earthing.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    georgia
    Posts
    562
    There was a thread I followed a few weeks ago on another site about whole house protectors.

    The general thought was that the non-breaker types were better (they could usually handle more joules). A protector should handle at least four "modes" (combinations of L1/L2/neutral) and comply with UL1449 3rd edition standards.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Emerald Coast
    Posts
    924
    .
    For lunch money you can protect that control board in your furnace.

    EXPERiENCE has proven that.

    ..
    Do not attempt vast projects with
    half vast experience and ideas.
    ...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by b26440510 View Post
    The general thought was that the non-breaker types were better (they could usually handle more joules). A protector should handle at least four "modes" (combinations of L1/L2/neutral) and comply with UL1449 3rd edition standards.
    Neutral wire protector is irrelevant. Best protection on a neutral wire is a short (ie 'less than 10 foot') connection from that neutral wire to earth. Same short connection from other wires (L1, L2, etc) must be made via a protector. Only because those wires cannot connect to earth directly, like a neutral wire. Protectors are installed where an incoming wire cannot be earthed directly.

    A minimally sufficient 'whole house' protector starts at 50,000 amps. An effective Cutler-Hammer solution sells in Lowes and Home Depot for less than $50.

    More effective protectors do not absorb energy. An effective protector means energy dissipates harmlessly in earth. Protector must conduct a 20,000 amp direct lightning strike to earth - and remain functional. A minimally sufficient 'whole house' protector is 50,000 amps. With a connection to earth where 50,000 amps are harmlessly absorbed.

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