Temperature Variations in Older homes - Whats normal?
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  1. #1
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    Older homes can have lower insualtion levels, more air leaks, and sometimes less than desirable existing ductwork. Also, of course some rooms have more windows and face different directions for sun.

    So I will pose a question to any - and all - folks on this board:

    What kind of temperature variations do you see as "acceptable" within the different parts of an older home ??




  2. #2
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    there should be not more of a difference than in new homes. Good and comfortable homes have been built already centuries ago. Bad once are getting build today as well as yesterday.

  3. #3
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    3F just after blower shuts down

    the 1930s Honeywell round t-stat was accurate to 5/9F
    harvest rainwater,make SHADE,R75/50/30= roof/wall/floor, use HVAC mastic,caulk all wall seams!

  4. #4
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    Originally posted by bertrand
    Older homes can have lower insualtion levels, more air leaks, and sometimes less than desirable existing ductwork. Also, of course some rooms have more windows and face different directions for sun.

    So I will pose a question to any - and all - folks on this board:

    What kind of temperature variations do you see as "acceptable" within the different parts of an older home ??



    2 or 3 degrees
    This question really has nothing to do with the heating and air conditioning contractor unless you mean at the time the unit shuts off. During the off cycle there is nothing we can do to keep one room from changing temperature faster than others due to bad insulation or windows.

  5. #5
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    [/B][/QUOTE]
    2 or 3 degrees
    This question really has nothing to do with the heating and air conditioning contractor unless you mean at the time the unit shuts off. During the off cycle there is nothing we can do to keep one room from changing temperature faster than others due to bad insulation or windows. [/B][/QUOTE]

    You need to check your ductwork and regulate the flow of heat with the dampers. If you don't have any dampers, get some installed, this way you will be able to heat up or cool down a house evenly. When you have irregular heat loss, you will have to insulate, when you are not happy with the status quo.

  6. #6
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    Aug 2005
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    Originally posted by tostaos
    2 or 3 degrees
    This question really has nothing to do with the heating and air conditioning contractor unless you mean at the time the unit shuts off. During the off cycle there is nothing we can do to keep one room from changing temperature faster than others due to bad insulation or windows. [/B][/QUOTE]

    You need to check your ductwork and regulate the flow of heat with the dampers. If you don't have any dampers, get some installed, this way you will be able to heat up or cool down a house evenly. When you have irregular heat loss, you will have to insulate, when you are not happy with the status quo. [/B][/QUOTE]

    Thanks,

    I have accepted that some parts of my older home may differ from others in that 2 or maybe 3 degree range depending on the time of day and the heating cycle.

    However, one of the bedrooms and the living room varies by up to 5-6 degrees. I can set controller to 74 and those spaces are 68.5 during cold of night. Other parts of home are pretty uniform around 71-72.

    I have tried shutting off certain registers in an attempt to balance the home. No luck.

    My authorized carrier installer is going to come back and install an additional supply register in the bedroom and one in the living room to try to get those within the 2 or 3 range of the rest of home.

    It would be great to simply replace existing supply ducts to the bedroom and living room but they are buried in an inaccessable finished ceiling in the basement and I don't want to start tearing down the ceiling in mass to get to them.



    [Edited by bertrand on 11-19-2005 at 10:43 AM]

  7. #7
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    Jul 2005
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    []
    You stated;
    "I have tried shutting off certain registers in an attempt to balance the home. No luck."

    do you mean the registers would not shut off, or(If they did shut off) there was no change in the room temperature?... seems hard to believe....

    And your posting is a very uniformative one. Your home may have an R 20 in the walls in one room and none in another.Your duct size to one room may be too small, while another room could be fed by an oversized one.There are too many unanswered questions to ever give you a proper and definite answer.

  8. #8
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    Aug 2005
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    93
    Originally posted by deejoe
    []
    You stated;
    "I have tried shutting off certain registers in an attempt to balance the home. No luck."

    do you mean the registers would not shut off, or(If they did shut off) there was no change in the room temperature?... seems hard to believe....

    And your posting is a very uniformative one. Your home may have an R 20 in the walls in one room and none in another.Your duct size to one room may be too small, while another room could be fed by an oversized one.There are too many unanswered questions to ever give you a proper and definite answer.
    Some supply diffusers have blades and I have adjusted them from partial to full closed. Some diffusers have no blades and I used magnetic covers to partially or fully block them. The rooms I blocked, which we running a bit hot (interior bathrooms, and one bedroom), did cool down a bit - however the other "problem rooms" did not heat up in response.

    The two rooms which are coldest are on the exterior and have the most windows of any of the other rooms. The stat is located in the middle of the home in the hallway so I don't doubt it is warmer there then in a bedroom with exterior walls and windows

    As an engineer, I realize there is no way to obtain or post all the information here. There is no way for anyone know the information on existing insulation levels - but I did have a thermal scan done and know where the weak spots are.

    My authorized carrier dealer is not impressing me, but I am asking him to solve these problems. To be fare to him, he is dealing with exising ducts which are mostly inaccessible, and unknown home construction details.

    While I wait for his third visit to resolve problems - I am Just looking for ideas and thoughts.

    [Edited by bertrand on 11-19-2005 at 11:33 AM]

  9. #9
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    Insulation values in a wall have not much influence on your load. Cracks and leaky windows need attention and a high R value in the ceiling, where most of your heat escapes.
    You need a load calculation for each room so you can figure out the size of the ductwork for each room.
    Your airflow to each room can as well be measured and compared to the calculated design values.
    This all is already over the head of many contractors out there and it could be difficult for you to find one. There is a lot of work and time involved, that is so hard to charge to the customer... no money in that line of work. It's a free market economy.

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