Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    26

    New recovery machine

    Ok guys i went against your advice and bought the appion G1 single. Johnstone had them on sale for $439. My question is if any of you guys ever use your recovery machines to pull vacuums and if anyone has every used this particular in lieu of a vacuum pump how many microns will i be able to achieve with this machine. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    North Eastern NC
    Posts
    80
    You will most likely be buying a new machine real soon if you use it to pull vacuum beyond simple recovery. Also, you will not be able to sustain the micron requirement for deep vacuum.

    good luck.
    HAP

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    26
    thanks for the info. i have a vacuum pump on the way just thought i maybe able to sell it and just use the recovery machine but apparently not

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    644
    Quote Originally Posted by nic1911a1 View Post
    Ok guys i went against your advice and bought the appion G1 single. Johnstone had them on sale for $439. My question is if any of you guys ever use your recovery machines to pull vacuums and if anyone has every used this particular in lieu of a vacuum pump how many microns will i be able to achieve with this machine. Thanks

    You will probably not even get it low enough to even register on a micron gauge. It's a recovery machine not a vacuum pump.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    26
    yeah i did a little research and it only pulls -15 inmg but i did pull a vacuum on my gauges and it pulled it down to 550 microns. I am gonna just keep my vacuum pump

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    10
    Thank you nic1911a1 nic1911a1 for your question. I have a vacuum pump, and am now in the market for a recovery machine. Like you did a year ago, I am considering buying the Apion G1. It on sale (again) at Johnstone for $439. I had not considered it's limitation as far as pulling down to or below 550. Thank you for your finding.

    To HAP2 HAP2 & dijit's thank you for your insights.

    Most of all: thank you to those who concieved, built, and maintain this site. I query it regularly. This site is a huge asset to those that strive to be well informed and provide clients with educated quality service. As I become more experienced, I will add comments & advices. For now, though...thanks for the excellent questions & answers posted here.

  7. #7
    I used to work for a company that made us use recovery machines as vacuum pumps!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    North Eastern NC
    Posts
    80
    Some models are incorporating auto shut-off when it reaches 15" of vacuum. Either way it is still not the best solution to using a vacuum pump. As mentioned here by another member who has run a vacuum pump on a system for 3 weeks to achieve the desired results.

    HAP

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    26
    agreed. yellow jacket has an auto shut off on their machines. I decide to keep my vacuum pump

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Englewood, CO
    Posts
    121

    Recovery and Vacuum? Totally different ranges.

    I get this question a lot, but here's some reference numbers for you:
    -- Ideal evacuation is below 1,000 microns
    -- Recovery machines are required to pull down to 15" of mercury to meet EPA Section 608 certification requirements
    -- 15" of mercury is roughly 355,000 microns

    I haven't heard of reliable vacuums much further than 20" pulled by recovery machines in the field... meaning you can't get below 230,000 microns with one.

    Bottom line: use a vacuum pump if you are looking to get all the atmosphere and moisture out of the system during evacuation!

    Christian Pena - Appion Inc.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
    Posts
    2,220
    Quote Originally Posted by Appion-ChrisP View Post
    I get this question a lot, but here's some reference numbers for you:
    -- Ideal evacuation is below 1,000 microns
    -- Recovery machines are required to pull down to 15" of mercury to meet EPA Section 608 certification requirements
    -- 15" of mercury is roughly 355,000 microns

    I haven't heard of reliable vacuums much further than 20" pulled by recovery machines in the field... meaning you can't get below 230,000 microns with one.

    Bottom line: use a vacuum pump if you are looking to get all the atmosphere and moisture out of the system during evacuation!

    Christian Pena - Appion Inc.
    For god sakes, I don't see what the big deal is, I mean I use my vacuum pump for recovery all the time, don't you?





















































    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    26
    thanks bro

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    South Georgia
    Posts
    42
    I use the discharge air from the front of the machine (600 cfm according to Appion) to help cool the recovery tank (in the past i would cool the cylinder with ice and water in a five gallon bucket (this shortened recovery times with some of the first recovery machines)) It helps keep the temp down and let the tank fill quicker. just place the recovery cylinder about 12 inches front of the machine and let it rip.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event