Musty Smell Dirty Sock Syndrome - Page 2
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  1. #14
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    6,315
    In regards to the coated coils they are not treated with Teflon. The Technicoat coils use a phonelic coating which after a period of time will eventually cracks. The coating cracks because the coating has low elasticity properties and the expansion contraction of the material is less than the aluminum of the coil.

    Bronz Glo coated coils use a material closer to rubber but still remains basically heat transparent. It has greater elasticity and will not crack. The Bronz Glo coated coils also have an anti-microbial mixed into the coating.

    Contact Bronz-Glo in Florida and they can provide you with a contractor in your area that is an applicator. They also have spray cans of the coatings that can be applied with the coil in place by your local contractor. The spray cans are not as good as the immersed coil but it works fairly well.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    2,651

    Talking

    i knew that someone would catch that,...i always call them teflon coated coils,but your post was very well stated,and i learned something or two...thanks

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    deep south
    Posts
    12

    DDSyndrome Emergency Heat

    No offense taken, and we will try this. What happens is this. The weather turns cold and we start using the heater. It can take a few weeks, but as we use the heat, the smell starts and it is nasty mold smell, and has not gone away in the past two years until we replace the coil.

    I've spoken with so many dealers/companies and no one has suggested what you did about turning the emergency heat on and we will try that.

    What is your though on using the lesser filtering filter?

    _____________________________________

    "No snowflake in an avalanche ever feels responsible"

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    deep south
    Posts
    12

    Bronz Glow Coated Coil

    To your knowledge can coils coated in this material withstand UV Lights?

    Will call company.


  5. #18
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    6,315
    To some extent they can withstand the "UV" rays but the rays will eventually break down any petrochemical product.


    "UV" lights are basically worthless in any residential HVAC application. They are primarily a moneymaking product for companies. That is not to say the companies don't believe in them but there is no empirical data supporting their value and many solid studies to deny their viability.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    2,633
    Originally posted by classical
    That is not to say the companies don't believe in them but there is no empirical data supporting their value and many solid studies to deny their viability.
    Are there any links to these studies? I read a couple way back that attempted to prove benefit. Their methodology was dubious. But I haven't seen studies clearly proving no benefit. Just a smidge of common sense combined with little understanding of basic science it all one needs to know UV lights are usually worthless. But I like seeing the studies anyway.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    37

    Re: Trane Coil

    Originally posted by milkman's daughter
    Kevin,

    Is you unit a heat pump? Ours is. I am wondering if this is a problem that heat pumps have more than regular units. I've heard yes and no by dealers.

    Also, the filter type. I've been told the filter is good and not impeding air flow (not by the seller of the filter).

    Ghads
    Milkman, our system is NOT a heat pump. And coincidentally (or not), our old AC and coil were Bryants (as is the original furnace, which we are still using). The word is that Dirty Sock Syndrome (DSS) is more prevelant in heat pump systems, but can happen in regular AC systems as well (like ours).

    No offense to anyone on this board...please...but my experience in this last year+ (since our DSS problem began) has been that opinions on DSS are like belly buttons...everyone has one, but they're all different. I have been told I needed to replace my coil, I did...I needed to clean my coil, I did...I needed an expensive furnace cleaning (incl. blower motor, etc.), I did...I needed an entire new furnace, I DIDN'T...I needed to monitor my house humidity, I do (39-48%)...I needed to install a condensate pan disinfectant, I did...I needed cheap filters, I needed high Merv pleated filters, I needed something in between, I needed duct cleaning, I don't need duct cleaning.....you get the idea. Through all of this, only ONE time has someone entered my home and given me advice that did not entail making a big purcha$e. Milkman, I sense you feel you are running out of options and are frustrated. So are we, but let common sense and calm prevail, or you will find yourself in my position, with a huge moneypit in the basement of your home.

    I don't think anyone knows what causes DSS, nor why, nor how to resolve it. If I had it to do over again, I would start with the small inexpensive things (like cleaning my furnace blower motor myself, using a little better filter (a pleated Merv 7 should be enough), etc. Replacing entire systems, etc. should be a last resort.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    142
    For heat pumps only.

    Something our company has done to help with DSS is to offer the customer something that we call "cooking the coil". When you cook something, you are killing all the organisms in the food by raising the temperature to 160 degrees. What we do is run the heatpump with a high head pressure for 5-10 minutes which brings the coil to 160 degrees. We have had much success with this method. Warning, the unit was not made to run at these pressures and could cause a leak. We warn all customers.

    Something I have been thinking of lately is another method. That is to run your unit with the fan on all summer. This is when the mold growth occurs. Mold needs food (dust) and water to grow. By running the fan all the time, you dry up all that water on the coil after it has finished cooling, and in turn, do not allow the growth to occur. This causes high humidity in the house so you will need to invest in a dehumidifier. I have not proven this method yet.

    By the way, the reason you smell the smell when you put on the heat and not during the summer is mold offgases when it dries. Hope this helps.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    37
    MMD, the word from Trane is that they do not offer factory-coated coils. If Trane doesn't, then I would be surprised if anyone else does. I have heard of aftermarket coating solutions...Bronz-Glo, Technicoat, and others. I would suspect these solutions would not be for us, as I would think you would need to install this coating on a clean coil...not one that has already been attacked by mold, etc.

    Someone mentioned setting the thermostat to "On" in the cooling season, instead of "Auto". This may help the problem some, as it would run the furnace blower motor continuously, even when the AC is not running/cooling. It would force continuous air across the coil and disipate any residual moisture more quickly...making it harder for nasties to grow there. Of course, you should not HAVE to do this, if these systems were designed/installed properly. And, it may come with some drawbacks...your electric bill will be slightly higher (as the blower is constantly running), and I assume the wear on the blower motor would be exacerbated (some may disagree, stating it's harder on the motor to be cycling on and off).

    Kevin

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    deep south
    Posts
    12

    DSSmell/Fan on continuously

    We tried the fan on continuously during the summer, didn't work...

    Thanks for responding Kevin, wish we could figure this out.


  11. #24
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Lubbock Texas
    Posts
    769
    Milkman e-mail me or go to my web site I think I can help you.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    11

    Unhappy smell from ducts

    We have a York 3 ton unit, compressor outside air handler in the garage. It is 9 years old. We turned the heat on 2 weeks ago in Florida and noticed a funny smell coming through the ducts, not constant, but it was there. We thought it might be coming from outside, anyway I saw the fan was not turning on the compressor, so a tech came out and replaced the compressor fan motor. No smell for about a day, but it came back. Not constant, but seems to come when the outside temp is below 40. When we turn on e-heat or aux no smell at all. Can you help? We do not have mold or mildew in our house

  13. #26
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The South
    Posts
    555
    Hey Milkman ,frustrating situation for you.

    Haven't seen the set up of your air handler room/area so need some info.

    What type of drain set up is in the area of the air handler?
    Is your condensate drain from the air handler piped directly into a drain pipe, or does it go to an open drain?
    Or is it a condensate pump that runs the condensate somewhere else?

    I assume the coil is on the supply side of the air handler fan; or is it possibly in the return side?


    Do you have a condensing furnace(or any gas/oil fired),or water heater,other fuel fired appliances?

    Has anyone done testing to see if you have a negative pressure in the home,especially when the air handler is running?
    GO DAWGS!

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