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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    southern california
    Posts
    535
    How large of a home is this. If your home is larger than 4000 sq. ft then I would definately look into VRF by Mitsubishi or Daikin. The advantage is very short duct runs, higher efficiencies, very quiet, no ductwork across roofs, variable capacities,etc. The only disadvantage is the initial cost and it takes a better technician to install and service.If you want something a little more high tech then you could go with Daikin Altherma, add radiant heating in the floor, solar on the roof, heat and cool the space and the domestic hot water.

  2. #15
    First, I must say that this has been even more helpful than I expected. I had no idea about split ductless systems before (the Mitsubishi does look particularly cool) and some of the other options. My main hesitation is that I'm a fresh air freak and like to have air constantly circulating through the house. (We keep the "Fan" switch set to "On," rather than "Auto.") So I'm hesitant to move away from a traditional forced air ducted system. But maybe I need to rethink this preference. Again, I'm glad to be learning this now. Thank you.

    Yes, we do have to do Title 24 and in L.A., there's a separate "Green Inspector" that all this stuff has to be approved by. So I imagine many of the suggestions given here regarding ducting and insulation will be required, which is good, because my whole point in posting my original question is that I don't want an inefficient system.

    Regarding the option of putting the ducting in the floor, that may very well be what we have to do. The problem, though, is that because of the configurations of the beams and floor joists, it can't be entirely in the floor, so we'll have to make soffits in one or two of the first floor ceilings. I'd like to avoid soffits, but it's not like I hate them, so this might be our best option.

    The house is around 3,000 square feet altogether. The VRF system has an industrial look to it which won't fly with my wife, but I need to look further into it. I'll also check into the Daiken Altherma system when I get a chance.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Here and there
    Posts
    4,802
    Mini splits ( most ) run the fan 24/7 and cycle the outdoor unit based upon demand
    i belong to peta ... people eating tasty animals. all my opinions are just mine.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    southern california
    Posts
    535
    If ventilation is a key concern, which it should be, then Mitsubishi makes a product called Lossnay which could be incorporated into the design. If you need some help we are down in Orange County.

  5. #18
    That Lossnay system looks very interesting. Funny to think how primitive our current air-handling system is!

    I still need to research a little more to figure out how ventilation works with a mini-split system (I get the impression it's basically a "radiator" rather than forced air setup) but I could see combining a mini-split with a Lossnay system. Since Lossnay isn't necessarily handling the heating or cooling, I'm guessing it wouldn't need very many registers in the house, since evenness isn't that critical (unlike with the actual cooling or heating.)

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