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  1. #1
    I need to know if a Lennox G11E 63,500 but furnace is big enough to heat a 2200 sf home near chicago. If not how big do I need

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Crooksville, Ohio
    Posts
    77
    You need to find a contractor that will do a heat load calc. This is the best way to determine the correct size. When doing a heat load calc. the contractor needs to measure all your rooms, wall height, windows, doors, etc.
    All Seasons Heating & Cooling

  3. #3
    figure average house I've got the furnace just need to know if it will be close to big enough to hest the house would rather spend nothing with what I have instead of buying a new furnace

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bartlett, IL
    Posts
    6,619
    Kind of a corny question, but It depends on how tight your house is, are the btu's in or out?

    are you gonna be the installer?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    Originally posted by gmpeterson
    I need to know if a Lennox G11E 63,500 but furnace is big enough to heat a 2200 sf home near chicago. If not how big do I need

    Thanks
    Only two ways to find out.....the educated way by doing a load calc(HVAC-Calc at the top of this page or contractor) or the wise money saving way(install it and see if it works)
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    chicago suburbs
    Posts
    4,422
    Originally posted by gmpeterson
    I need to know if a Lennox G11E 63,500 but furnace is big enough to heat a 2200 sf home near chicago. If not how big do I need

    Thanks

    nope.
    FILL OUT YOUR PROFILE!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Derby City
    Posts
    3,958
    Mr. gmpetersen: what do You think?

    Everyone here tells you the ONLY way to correctly answer your question is by performing a load calculation, yet you STILL persist in trying to get an answer.

    If it doesn't matter to you if it's done right, then what difference does it make what OUR answer is?

    Not trying to incite you, but having the process done professionally and correctly, is in YOUR best interest. And most of us on this site agree, that if it's in YOUR best interest then it is also in OUR best interest.

    Many people will be more than willing to help you, if you let them. Step one, let someone perform a load calc for you. May cost you a few bucks but then you will know what you need, and after all, isn't that your question?
    Everyone has a purpose in life..........even if it's to be a bad example.

    Seek first to understand, before seeking to be understood.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Central Kansas
    Posts
    1,145
    I don't know... but it is small & light enough to fit easily in the back of the truck and haul off. Seriously, G11's are getting fairly old, give us the serial no. also and someone can tell you it's age. There is a brightly colored tab at the upper right of this page to do your own calculations and then you will know. Without measurements and facts, one can only guess and guessing just simply isn't good enough... we're HVAC guys, not weather forecasters. Do some homework first- measure all windows, doors, insulation levels, etc. make sure your directions are right (N,S,E,W) as orientation does matter. In our 2100+ sq ft house, this unit is way plenty large, but your home may not be made of 6" SIP's, ICF's for basement, low e windows, 13" of insul. (overkill, but it was on sale then) in the attic, facing South, no west windows, dark shingles, etc.

    All BS aside and please forgive my attempts at humor. I assume you are looking at buying this home, because if you lived there already you'd know if it performed well or not. Or, someone has it for sale cheap and you are thinking of installing it. Maybe a co-worker is getting rid of it and you can have it just for hauling it off. If the latter two are the case, all I can say is why even think of using a nearly antique furnace, I don't care if it's free? As Jeff Foxworthy says about buying rental cars- 'that would be like going to a house of ill repute looking for a wife. Anything that has been ridden that long and that hard is not what you want.' Honestly, one can only guess with the data provided. In your defense, we can't expect you to know all the info needed to properly determine what furnace is adequate, indadequate or overkill without experience (I mean proper experience) in the business. Do not trust a HVAC guy who uses rules of thumb to advise you one way or another. Trust one who uses a tape measure, notepad, eyes, asks questions, pries into the attic instead.
    Don't confuse me with facts, my mind is already made up.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    677
    It's perfect for your house. Don't let these guys give you a bunch of crap. They just want to sell you a new furnace that you don't need.I just ran a quickie calc. and determined it is just right for your house. Now you said close to Chicago. Is that close as in Little Rock, Ak. because it is perfect for there. Other wise maybe you should follow the learned gentelmens advice and get a proper load calc done. Sorry if it sounded promising but I face these questions almost weekly. I give them the same answer I gave you then walk away.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Derby City
    Posts
    3,958
    wally01 lmao. thanks.
    Everyone has a purpose in life..........even if it's to be a bad example.

    Seek first to understand, before seeking to be understood.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    chicago suburbs
    Posts
    4,422
    how close to chicago? what town? i'm in Schaumburg and my email address is in my profile... if you want to do this right.
    FILL OUT YOUR PROFILE!!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    the Great Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    607
    Could be oversized, but could be undersized, so better throw in two just to be sure. Remember in heating and a/c bigger IS better (except when it comes to ductwork DEFINIETLY better to be undersized so it can self balance) also make sure the furnaces have five ton blower drives so they can run the two goodman condensing units you can get for cheap on the internet
























    Yes this post is totally sarcastic you dont appear to want proper info so this is for the entertainment of the pro's

    [Edited by hvac-tech-lane on 11-12-2005 at 07:00 PM]

  13. #13
    Have any midwestern/chicagoland techs.heard of or use the sq.'x c.h. x 6.5 x 1.1 for 90%=approx.input btu or
    " "1.2 for 80%=approx.input btu

    of coarse it's not an accurate heat load calculation but how close is it ?

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