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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    oregon
    Posts
    139
    In my area you can rent some locating equipment from a Rigid tool supplier. I would make sure who ever does the locating is trained/certified though. Depending on what type of equipment used other metal objects will pick the signal up causing what we refer to as "ghost signal". Nothing worse than marking something and it is not there or something else is in its place.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,242
    Have you considered something like an electrical circuit tracer? These place an RF type signal through two conductors that can be sensed by an adjustable receiver. I have one made by Amprobe that has helped me locate several circuits buried deep in walls. It doesn't do too well for conduit runs but it will find un-encased wires in fairly deep walls. deepest I've done have been brick over sheathing at max sensitivity. Hook one lead to one tube and the other to the other then trace. I have the AT-1000, here's a link..
    http://amprobe.com/cgi-bin/pdc/searc...&action=search
    “Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I’m not sure about the universe.” —Albert Einstein

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    7
    Thanks - let me check into those

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    354

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by toughguy1 View Post
    Thanks Flange. Thes, I didn't bid on the job. I am doing the engineering design. They asked me to first research the easiest, least disruptive, and least expensive way to design the renovation. The research will be by the hour and the drawings will be for a fixed price. Now, I am leaning towards cutting a number of access holes to put my eyes on it. These holes will be cut by a general contractor. There will be more demolition this way, but my drawings will be more accurate. Once I design the new drawings, including the demolition drawings, we will put them out for bid for mechanical and general contractors.
    hey tough this is just my opinion, i like visual only so you eliminate suprises! also, my opinion is if you have really old line sets , say r-22, then change over to 410A, what concerns me, is the 50% higher pressures after running on r-22 for years. i worry about pourus pipes, pin hole leaks developing soon after the conversion to 410A which means opening up walls once again. and possible splitting of pipes, thought being, nothing lasts forever. my brother is replacing his 22 year old system and i told him have the contractor put in new lines, it's extra, but your starting off new.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    7
    Thes, very good concern. I would absolutely pressure test any pipes that I re-use with a 150% pnuematic test over-night. If the pipes are good, I may be able to cut the demolition and destruction of the historic walls, floors, molding, wainscoting, etc. in half.

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