How do I properly charge a reach in cooler
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Virginia
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    How do I properly charge a reach in cooler

    My question is that my boss told me the proper way to charge a reach in cooler is to make sure the ambient temperature inside the reach in cooler is 10* above the evaporator coil tempreature. So for example if the evap coil temperature is 35* then the ambient inside the reach in should be 45* and you have a proper charge. or evap temp 25* then ambient inside reach in 35* etc...... is this the correct way to charge a reach in?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Chicago
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    474
    No. The ambient in the reach in doesnt indicate charge level. Could be overcharged could be undercharged. Typically on a self contained reach in unit the system charge will be indicated on the data plate. Then you weigh it in.

  3. #3
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    Jul 2011
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    what if there already is refrigerant in the system, is there a way of just adding instead of recovering it all and putting it back in? it's a cap tube style system.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Cap tube systems are critically charged.

    The best and most time effective method to charge them is to pull the charge, evacuate and weigh your charge in if you have a listed charge weight.

  5. #5
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    Feb 2006
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    also sometimes with cap tubes they appear to be low when in fact they are restricted .. not saying ur not aware, just adding valuable insight

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by hvac wiz 79 View Post
    also sometimes with cap tubes they appear to be low when in fact they are restricted .. not saying ur not aware, just adding valuable insight
    This is why, when I suspect a charge problem OR a restricted cap tube, I pull charge and weigh it back in.

    This eliminates the charge as a variable and allows you to make a good, informed and accurate diagnosis.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    5,949
    If it's a R134a cooler using a cap tube and it's been running hot bring some cap tubes with ya.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    If it's a R134a cooler using a cap tube and it's been running hot bring some cap tubes with ya.
    & a C032CAPT drier! ...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Central PA
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    I'm no Refrigeration expert. More of an AC guy given the opportunity to work on "commercial" AC as well as refrigeration equipment. Suffice it to say; I'm still learning. With these small units, yeah, it's best to dump the couple of ounces of refrigerant and start from scratch. Especially if you don't know the service history of the unit in question. If, for whatever reason, that is not ideal I've noticed that reach in coolers (as well as display cases) that are operating normally (in ambient conditions under 75 degrees) seem to run with a TD of appx 20 degrees. That seems to be their "comfort zone". That's not a good method to charge a unit but will give you an idea of what's going on at least. Also, airflow is ultra critical on these little bastards.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    12,153

    Clean the condenser and add some refrigerant

    Clean the condenser to spotless see-right-through condition.

    After the condenser is clean - if the suction pressure is low and the SSH high - add some refrigerant. If the head pressure gets to 35 over ambient without the suction pressure / temperature coming into line - pull the refrigerant and replace the drier and the cap tube before recharging.

    Cap tubes in refrigeration are now like capacitors in residential A/C - they used to never go bad but now are changed as often as socks.

    I think I'm going to start installing 1/4 ton IE TXV's in place of cap tubes.

    PHM
    -------





    Quote Originally Posted by infinitend View Post
    I'm no Refrigeration expert. More of an AC guy given the opportunity to work on "commercial" AC as well as refrigeration equipment. Suffice it to say; I'm still learning. With these small units, yeah, it's best to dump the couple of ounces of refrigerant and start from scratch. Especially if you don't know the service history of the unit in question. If, for whatever reason, that is not ideal I've noticed that reach in coolers (as well as display cases) that are operating normally (in ambient conditions under 75 degrees) seem to run with a TD of appx 20 degrees. That seems to be their "comfort zone". That's not a good method to charge a unit but will give you an idea of what's going on at least. Also, airflow is ultra critical on these little bastards.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

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