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  1. #27
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    11,956

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    534

    Talking

    Dolores: Call Donald Trump he's always looking for a Apprentice!!!!

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Yo.... Here!, I'm right here..
    Posts
    6,236
    Yeah and non of them are anywhere near fifty, pretty much shows where we are at.

    Hey mama I was giving you the straight skinny,

    And I know no one wanted to hear it BUT "Truth is no one want's old F's like us.

    Like 50 is old ??

    yeah right!!!

    I worked with a 30 yr old fat employee today and he was huffing and puffing and sweating,and couldn't keep up...

    I didn't even break a sweat, and I did most the work

    So get yourself a job with a company that HAS to Fill a quota and they will apprentice you and you can get paid Union wages or prevailing wage and bene's and Maybe a retirement package to go with you're military bene's.

    And you are home free.

    Or do you have a point to prove???

    like What????

    I was trying to help ohhhhh and hey Good Luck

    Get smart or get use to the rejection.

    BEST OF LUCK and WELCOME TO HVAC-TALK Dolores

  4. #30
    ah Dolores.... now that I have you "pegged" ... I feel I know you better.

    Irish huh? That makes us kindred spirits...


    When Edison was working on his invention of the mono-fillament lamp ... best recognised as "The Electric Light", he encountered many people who said "NO!" In fact, most spoke like that to his efforts.

    But .... after over one thousand FAILURES ... he finally succeeded!!!
    And once he made his first sucessful light bulb ... everything else was a piece of cake afterwards!

    Once you land your first job ...everything else will be a piece of cake!


    I sugest you make friends with a parts store manager or one of their outside sales persons.
    They KNOW who is who in your neck of the woods.
    Invite them out to lunch and be up front about WHY you are wanting their time.

    First you want to "qualify them" as being a positive person.
    You need to establish this person, man or woman is a person who can see PAST your age and lack of field experience and SEE through what is more important... which is: you are here for the long haul and someone is about to get a wonderful deal on a great employee!!!

    THEN invite them for lunch.
    Pick their brain. Let them ask you the questions. Just listen.
    Stick to the subject at hand: ie, you want to invest yourself into the local economy and work for a reputable contractor who will value your labors and in turn, provide you the means necessary to earn your way in this world!
    All you are asking for in an OPPORTUNITY.

    Once this sales person is sold on you as a person ... they in turn will feel obligated to sell you to one of their current customers.
    These sales people visit larger contractors all day long, five days a week.
    They engage in golf, meals, phone calls, etc ... they schmooze and chat their way thru the week.
    The last thing you ever want to do is dissapoint either the sales person who got you the initial interview or the employer who hired you.


    Get with somebody who will be objective with you and do some role playing. Do some mock job interviews.

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Denver,CO
    Posts
    77
    Lusker and pjs-thanks for the input.Lusker,I will break up my posts from here on!Sorry to all for previous lengthy posts.


    R12rules,checked out your profile.I can tell by that you are a good guy.Your latest suggestion is one that I never would have thought of on my own.I may use it,if my current job prospect doesn't work out.Yes,since I last posted,I have applied for a job with a local heating and ac place that is looking for UNTRAINED installation tech helpers (and that's ME!)for residential.I filled out an app.just yesterday(the 8th)and when I called back this morning the woman said they were still receiving and looking over a number of apps,including mine.She's a very nice woman.The place is a family-owned-and-operated business.The woman I spoke with on the phone-and later met-encouraged me over the phone to come in.She said that they had hired female techs before and that they actually PREFER to hire and TRAIN people their own way.So,wish me luck!!Tomorrow or Friday could be my dream-come-true!!!!

    Well,it's 12:30am and I'd better get to bed.Try to sleep.

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Yo.... Here!, I'm right here..
    Posts
    6,236
    Hey D,

    Good luck

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Denver,CO
    Posts
    77
    Well...once again,I didn't get the job.So I'm going to do what my best friend says I should do:START MY OWN BUSINESS.

    The Small Business Administration is there to help people like me and I'm going to use them.They even have a special unit just to aid women.So,no more door-to-door begging for ME!If these men don't want to hire me,I'll just go ahead and do what I eventually planned to do anyway.I know that there is a LOT of competition in HVAC but if that doesn't deter men from "going for it" then it won't deter me.The only way I will gain field experience,it has become pain- fully clear to me,is to strike out on my own.

    I have no delusions about how tough it will be.I know that I will run into people(potential customers)who won't want a woman tech.But I'm confident that others WILL want-even prefer-a female,for whatever reasons.In any case I will have to prove myself,I know that.But with my best friend's support and help(as a friend and business partner)I feel fairly confident that I/we can do this.My watchwords will be "patience" and "strength."


  8. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bartlett, IL
    Posts
    6,619
    Holy smokes!

    Good luck starting your own business...

    It's NOT that simple...

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Denver,CO
    Posts
    77
    Originally posted by 2hot2coolme
    Holy smokes!

    Good luck starting your own business...

    It's NOT that simple...

    Yes,I know it's not.But the chauvenist men in this business have driven me to it...AND I'M GLAD.Because I would rather work for myself and reap ALL the profits
    and rewards than to take scraps from some a**hole man
    who thinks that women belong at home with the babies
    and the dirty laundry!!

    Okay,guys.I know I'm going to ruffle a few feathers by
    saying this stuff.Go ahead-spew if you must.It won't
    change my mind.

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,708
    No experience and going to start your own biz.

    Good Luck.

    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Suppy NC
    Posts
    4,513
    dolores
    first good luck
    the way i see it you have a lot to offer to someone in this trade. you have a couple stricks against you right off the bat. one you are a woman and it is not easy to be excepted as has been said already. two you are fifty and the makes it even harder then being a woman. this is a very tough trade. it is hard an the body most of all. you will find as time goes on there are a lot of things the younger ones can do us alder wont even try. it was said get knee pads this was good advise this trade is hard on the knees.
    you are starting out on your own and i admire you for it. keep in mind being fresh out of school there is a whole lot you were not shown. schooling is the best way to get a start in this trade and it will be ongoing as long as you want to be good. to go on your own right out of school may be a mistake. it would be better to get some time in the feild first and learn all you can because there is so very much you have not learned from your instructors

    i would recomend the first thing you do is go and become NATE certified. this will aid you in getting a jod and also help you with your own company. Nate is a way to tell what you know and is a way advertize. being fresh out of school you should be able to pass with just a little study

    good luck and i wish you good furtune
    wayne

  12. #38
    hvacmama, are you ready to work ten, twelve, fourteen, or sixteen hour days on for months straight during the busy seasons? Are you able to crawl in and out and in and out of crawlspaces, basements, attics, closets, etc? Once you get your tools together they will weight about fifty pounds in one hand and thirty in the other, they will go everywhere with you, up stairs, up ladders, through hallways. It ain't easy. How about the elements? How do you make out for months straight out in the sun in a uniform in 90/100 degree weather with a condenser blowing 130 degree air in your face? Or working on furnaces in subzero weather in basements, garages, barns, attics, unconditioned crawlspaces? How do you feel about spiders? rodents? How do you make out torquing on two 24 inch pipe wrenches on your back with no leverage for hours sometimes?

    If you can answer an exhuberant "YES" to all of this AND MORE you will be a great technician.

    [Edited by ryan_the_furnace_guy on 11-12-2005 at 09:21 PM]

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    45

    Thumbs up

    I try to be as honest as possible with people, HVAC is hard work. I do not like the "HOT" attics, long hours, and back breaking work. When your in tech school everything is ideal working conditions, in the field, this is very rare if ever. I remember when I got out of tech school I had completed the whole program, and tought I was "the man", but found out quickly I was green and had a lot to learn. I have had six helpers in the last two years, all thought HVAC work was easy, but found out it can be very hard at times, they all quit. I had one helper, he completed the whole HVAC course, very knowledgeable, but could not handle the heat, tight spaces, and not going home after eight hours of work. A few people said the parts houses would be a good place to start, I agree 100%, a knowledgeable parts person is very valuable in the line of work, a lot of the parts people make as much if not more than the techs. Don't take offense to everything that has been said here, we are in the field and know what we are talking about. I honestly wish you the best, you made it through the HVAC course, that says a lot about you, I am sure you will find a job that is suited to you skills. Best of Luck....

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