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Thread: Unused rooms

  1. #14
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    Feb 2004
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    2,597
    perhaps another situation you are not considering is the release of vapors from everyday objects. by closing off a room you are not allowing it to breathe. thus concentrations of these vapors will dwell in the enclosed area.

    another issue is humidity control. any wooden furniture in these rooms? wooden floors? wood contracts with a lack of moisture. on the other hand carpeting will retain moisture and could cause mold issues in the summer months.

    bottom line, if your in-laws stay in these rooms, then by all means close them off.

    good luck.

  2. #15
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    Jul 2005
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    dan sw fi; even IF the cost of heating and cooling only amounts to $ 1000. a year, a savings of 3% would be $ 30.
    not bad for the few minutes it takes to adjust a couple of DAMPERS,eh?

  3. #16
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    I would sugest a service call to go thru your system for an annual check up, close the registers you want, and have the tech check the heat rise and adjust if nessecary.
    never say never

  4. #17
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    Dec 2002
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    Houston,Tx.
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    Originally posted by docholiday
    I'd be curious if there is any real savings by not conditioning a room. I strongly suspect your bills will not be reduced.
    I would have to agree with you there Doc.
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  5. #18
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    Nov 2004
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    Question Ambient Tolerance

    Originally posted by deejoe
    amounts to $ 1000. a year, a savings of 3% would be $ 30. Not Bad for the few minutes it takes to adjust a couple of DAMPERS,eh?
    Adjust your room temp by 9'F: 20+% energy reduction.
    NOT Bad for 9 seconds to adjust T-Stat.
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  6. #19
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    Originally posted by docholiday
    I'd be curious if there is any real savings by not conditioning a room. I strongly suspect your bills will not be reduced.
    There will be some savings,IF the duct system is designed correctly.

    Cost can go up if the reductiontionin airflow,causes the static to rise to a point the the "total" airflow thru the system is reduced.

    But ,Doc already knew that.Any other thoughts,Doc?

  7. #20
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    Originally posted by contactor
    I would sugest a service call to go thru your system for an annual check up, close the registers you want, and have the tech check the heat rise and adjust if nessecary.

    Good idea to be safe.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    24
    Originally posted by deejoe
    dan sw fi; even IF the cost of heating and cooling only amounts to $ 1000. a year, a savings of 3% would be $ 30.
    not bad for the few minutes it takes to adjust a couple of DAMPERS,eh?
    With natural gas prices going up, that could be my heating cost for 1 month. This is a 3300 sq. foot (above grade - not counting 1200 sq. foot basement finished area) home with an inefficient unit. 3% adds up to be very significant savings! 1% would be worth doing this.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    922

    Hmm Rooms don't all need heat

    Sounds like you have got all the advice this topic could get. Things that depend on savings are simple for you. Will the design of the house affect the heat in other section of the house if this room is cold? Such as having that bed room warm does it helps insulate other sections of the house. Other considerations will depend on the thermostat locations.

    If you have your ventilation balanced with these rooms in mined you can do what ever you want. I suggest you have the system balanced. Tell the balancer you will be closing down the diffusers at times and he will set you up with a permanent solution.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    44
    Originally posted by philbiker
    What is the best way to minimize heat/ac to unused rooms in a typical house? Close the vents? Or does that affect pressure of the system too much to make it worth the trouble? I've got a couple guest rooms that don't need to be heated 95% of the time, what's the most fuel and equipment efficient way to deal with them?
    I also had house built ~3400sq ft 80% Single Stage bryant 311AAV048-110 CK5P 343G state: IN.

    Closing dampers did absolutly nothing to my bill....
    Try it if you have lot's of free time.

    Few reasons were:
    1) Guest bedrooms are smallest in the house by sq ft.
    2) First floor has 9' ceilings, and two story entryway.
    3) First floor has tons of windows, glass front and patio doors, etc.
    4) Guest bedrooms, only have single small window each.

    Don't waste your time and your money and risk overheating or overcooling.



    What works for me:
    1) Zoned house for economy ( 3 large zones: 1st, 2nd floor and basement )
    - At night first floor allowed to drop 9F below second floor temp, second floor temp drops 7F.
    - During the day second floor allowed to drop 9F below first floor temp. When we are away fist floor temp is lowered by 7F.
    - House thermostats will get house warm and toasty btw 5pm and 9pm and 5am - 7am.

    Zoning choices:
    1) Integrated ( aka Infinity ) lowers CFMs when zones closed
    2) Controlled leaks ( dampers set to leak air to maintain at least 70% capacity )
    3) Dump zone. bypass damper installed to dump extra air volume...
    4) Bypass.

    Option 1 - was not availble to me.
    Option 4 - I did not like as it would eventually overcool / overheat air.

    2,3 combo worked really well. I modified duct to dump excess air into the two story entryway, and set all my dampers to leak. I used EWC panel.

    Cooling bill droped 20+% first month. My hope heating bill would show some good savings too.

    Moral of this story: don't waste your time closing supply air ducts inside small rooms. Zone it.


  11. #24
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    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
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    The Original Poster here has a couple of rooms s/he wants in semi-permanent setback ,it will save money,if the duct system doesn't cause the fan to underdeliver cfms required.


    Now zoning with the setbacks you described could save more.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
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    If you're popping a grand a month into heating your home, you really might want to consider having a comfort speciallist look over your entire system, as a highly effecient unit with a proper zoning setup could pay for itsself quickly in your case. JMO
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    24
    Originally posted by smokin68
    If you're popping a grand a month into heating your home, you really might want to consider having a comfort speciallist look over your entire system, as a highly effecient unit with a proper zoning setup could pay for itsself quickly in your case. JMO
    Ha! No kidding! The house isn't even 2 years old!

    Long story short: (1) The builder's rep wasn't bright enough to upsell me on the more efficient model HVAC when I specifically asked for the upgrade to programmable thermostats to save money. (2) I wasn't brighte enough to ask for the upgraded HVAC whan I asked for the thermostats to improve efficiency. I'm basing my estimate of $1K per month to heat on the $4-500 bills last year and natural gas prices a little more than doubling (worst case scenario - I hope!). I've already turned the thermostat down this year and have resigned myself to sweaters and slippers. There's another thread in here with my name asking about what amounted to switching out my A/C units for a heat pump. Thanks for the advice, I am aware of what the real solution is.... Just not ready to take the plunge yet.

    This place is great, thanks on behalf of all the homeowners you all have helped out. Hopefully my HVACs won't be working as hard this year since I've switched from way too restrictive pleated filters to blue fiberglass ones.
    Moral of this story: don't waste your time closing supply air ducts inside small rooms. Zone it.
    The home already has two zones since there's an HVAC for the upper level and a separate one for the lower level. Both set for large temp swings when my wife and I are out of the house. 9 foot ceilings on both levels. ug! Good HVAC installation though - the builder works with good contractors.

    [Edited by philbiker on 11-02-2005 at 06:24 PM]

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