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Thread: Unused rooms

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  1. #1
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    Sep 2005
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    What is the best way to minimize heat/ac to unused rooms in a typical house? Close the vents? Or does that affect pressure of the system too much to make it worth the trouble? I've got a couple guest rooms that don't need to be heated 95% of the time, what's the most fuel and equipment efficient way to deal with them?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    You can close off the dampers that are located on the branches of the supply trunk. Dont close off to many though.

  3. #3
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    Sep 2004
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    What is the best way to minimize heat/ac to unused rooms in a typical house?

    You axed what the best way would be and IMO i would say a zoned system would be the best way

    every time you close off a regester to a room you are buying problems down the road. your system was built to deliver so many CFM's through a certain size duct throughout the entire system, by blocking off regesters you are forcing that amount of air to flow through duct that wasnt sized for it

  4. #4
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    Sep 2005
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    Are you recommending setting up a system that zones the individual rooms in the upstairs? Since it's all flex duct and there's an attic above this area that should be fairly easy. Would that do substantially more than what coolwhip has suggested? I'm just talking about a couple guest rooms here. The house already has two zones each with their own HVAC, one upstairs one downstairs and basement.

  5. #5
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    I suggested the simpleist way and the least expensive. If your interested in zoning, then have a licensed mechanical contractor come out and evaluate the system. A zoned system with remote room sensors is awesome when set up correctly.

  6. #6
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    You must have the proper airflow across the coils of a/c + heat pump systems and heat exchangers of fuel fired furnaces so they don't freeze, trip on limits or crack heat exchangers. With a zoned system you also need a bypass damper to move the restricted airflow elsewhere. You should be able to find a web site or link here that describes how they work. A professional should design and install this type of system.
    Proud supporter of Springfield Millers and Oregon Ducks.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
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    If your system is properly designed ,which is about 30% of all systems,based on testing that has been done,"partially" closing one or two grilles,is not a probblem if they represent 30% of the systems air flow.Not a reduction of 30% of air flow.

    The larger the system the more grilles this may be.

    Partially closing ,would mean enough,to raise/lower the temperature,2 or 3 from the rest of the home.


    Closing them off completely is not the best for humidity,air quality,or the equipment,even if you add a zoning system.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    24

    Thanks a lot everyone!

    Great advice, thanks much. After looking at the morbidly fascinating "Wall Of Shame" here (aside - has PaysonHVAC ever seen a good job?) I have to feel good about the systems installed in my home. My inspector and local HVAC maintenance company like it at least they tell me they do. The builder has a reputation for doing very good work, specifically having very longstanding relationships with the best contractors, and treating their contractors very good.

    And I've learned so much from you professionals here, thanks again. I've learned stuff like....

    * I'm happy that I had the HVAC company/Builder install prgrammable thermostats instead of buying them on my own from Home Depot and installing them as best as I can.
    * I've got a big pile of restrictive 1" pleated filters that have been replaced by blue fiberglass ones. I just wish I hadn't ever used the pleated ones in the first place.
    * Other good stuff.

    Though I think you guys are a little tough sometimes on the people who have never been educated about basic maintenance. It blows my mind that people don't know to change their filters regularly, but I don't blame them for their ignorance......

    [Edited by philbiker on 11-01-2005 at 12:45 PM]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    717
    Dash has given (imo) the best way to do this. Cutting a couple of rooms down approx 30 % (Max.)is the way to go. Sure, as one poster suggested to go the 'zone' route. That would be nice if you got a few hundred $$$$ to throw around.
    Take a few minutes,keep your $$$$, and simply 'damper' these rooms down a touch, no problem.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    Originally posted by deejoe
    Dash has given (imo) the best way to do this. Cutting a couple of rooms down approx 30 % (Max.)is the way to go. Sure, as one poster suggested to go the 'zone' route. That would be nice if you got a few hundred $$$$ to throw around.
    Take a few minutes,keep your $$$$, and simply 'damper' these rooms down a touch, no problem.
    I think that's exactly what I'll try. Though I do like the idea of zoning the whole house....... And replacing my A/C cool only unit with a geothermal heat pump..... Time will tell.....

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
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    Eugene, Oregon
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    deejoe, giving options and solutions are the nature of this site. All replies should be taken as opinions and understood by thread starters that these are opinions and or suggestions. Only a qualified HVAC contractor that is on site can give a HO the best possible solution for they're specific problem or needs, sometimes that cost's $$$$$$.
    Proud supporter of Springfield Millers and Oregon Ducks.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    7,680
    I'd be curious if there is any real savings by not conditioning a room. I strongly suspect your bills will not be reduced.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
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    Thumbs up L.O.L.

    Originally posted by docholiday
    I'd be curious if there is any real savings by not conditioning a room. I strongly suspect your bills will not be reduced.
    GREAT Savings ... 3% ?
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

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