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  1. #1
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    KALA-016E TAC 800

    Anyone know the capacity @ medium temp using R134a ?

  2. #2
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    Jun 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Anyone know the capacity @ medium temp using R134a ?
    Here's the capacity when used in a Copeland "C" line unit.

    10,230 btuh @ +20 SST @ 90 Ambient
    11,350 " " "

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by powell View Post
    Here's the capacity when used in a Copeland "C" line unit.

    10,230 btuh @ +20 SST @ 90 Ambient
    11,350 " " "
    Thanks powell
    And what is the "C" line ?
    This compressor is runinng 3 Russel evaporators in a floral display.
    Russel model # WE 18-55
    5500 btur @ 10* TD
    6600 btur @ 12* TD
    3-front glass doors & 1-end glass door.
    What's your thinking ?
    Thanks,
    VTP

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Thanks powell
    And what is the "C" line ?
    Sorry for the tardy response, I had to wait for my AOP clearance.

    The C-line is/was a popular Copeland unit that I've used for years to establish the approximate buth's of a semi-hermetic compressor. You'd recognize them, they have two horizontal receivers mounted under the compressor and they're built like a tank.

    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    This compressor is runinng 3 Russel evaporators in a floral display.
    Russel model # WE 18-55
    5500 btur @ 10* TD
    6600 btur @ 12* TD
    3-front glass doors & 1-end glass door.
    What's your thinking ?
    Thanks,
    VTP
    The unit and evaps are matched good. It equates to about a 7.6 TD for a 38 degree box. That's good for maintaining the required higher humidity in a floral box.

    Without knowing the box dimensions I can't speak for the btuh capacity required.

  5. #5
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    Aug 2007
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    Winter Haven, FL
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    4,379
    The "c" line is commonly referred to as a "pontoon unit". Like the boat. Its good for selling ots of refrigerant.

  6. #6
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    Jan 2010
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    I here ya Joe
    When i walk up to those type of units my jug starts to scream
    Last edited by VTP99; 07-23-2011 at 09:40 PM.

  7. #7
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    Guayaquil EC
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    Somebody at Copeland was on the ball when they designed that unit oh so many years ago.

    Those twin receivers made for excellent structural rigidity and allowed for a lower profile.

    Also, because the receiver diameters were typically under 6", they didn't have to ASME Certified and inspected vessels....which equated to a boatload of cost savings.

    Best of all, that parallel design actually worked.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by powell View Post
    Sorry for the tardy response, I had to wait for my AOP clearance.

    The C-line is/was a popular Copeland unit that I've used for years to establish the approximate buth's of a semi-hermetic compressor. You'd recognize them, they have two horizontal receivers mounted under the compressor and they're built like a tank.


    The unit and evaps are matched good. It equates to about a 7.6 TD for a 38 degree box. That's good for maintaining the required higher humidity in a floral box.

    Without knowing the box dimensions I can't speak for the btuh capacity required.
    Thanks again powell.
    They are not using the box for flowers so the TD is not so important.
    Form what i'm told the last coil has a tendacy to freeze.
    Those coils have a total capacity of 1.5 ton and your saying that compressor is less then a ton. So i'm worried about that.
    I'll get the box size for you to see what you think.
    Thanks,
    VTP

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    Somebody at Copeland was on the ball when they designed that unit oh so many years ago.

    Those twin receivers made for excellent structural rigidity and allowed for a lower profile.

    Also, because the receiver diameters were typically under 6", they didn't have to ASME Certified and inspected vessels....which equated to a boatload of cost savings.

    Best of all, that parallel design actually worked.
    icemeister,
    These condensers sure hold a large charge.
    Do you think that was for long run remote setups ?

  10. #10
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    Monmouth Junction-NJ-USA
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    I service a LAC-3 3 hp Low temp with the dual receivers underneath. A lot of refrigerant!!!!
    If you really know how it works, you have an execellent chance of fixin' er up!

    Tomorrow is promised to no one...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    Chicago
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    Name:  IMAG0083.jpg
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Size:  41.1 KB

    "The pontoon"

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    icemeister,
    These condensers sure hold a large charge.
    Do you think that was for long run remote setups ?
    Large receivers were pretty much the standard years ago. Those were the days when quality and suitability for an application really meant something.

    When I started out, most supermarkets were still conventional, single compressor systems. It was typical for a 3 HP unit to have at least a 40 lb receiver, a 5 Hp might have a 60 and a 7 1/2 could have a 100 lb or larger.

    Today, it's tough to find a stock unit with anything close to that kind of pumpdown capacity...except for the C-Line Copeland.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    Large receivers were pretty much the standard years ago. Those were the days when quality and suitability for an application really meant something.

    When I started out, most supermarkets were still conventional, single compressor systems. It was typical for a 3 HP unit to have at least a 40 lb receiver, a 5 Hp might have a 60 and a 7 1/2 could have a 100 lb or larger.

    Today, it's tough to find a stock unit with anything close to that kind of pumpdown capacity...except for the C-Line Copeland.
    icemeister,
    Do you know of a way to figure the capacity on these receivers ?

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