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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    10
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    What reasons could there be for not oversizing a modulating condensing boiler (aside from cost). If a boiler has a 5:1 turn down ratio what is the difference in buying a 100k btu or a 200k btu unit? After all, the unit is going to modulate its firing rate for the heating demand isnt it? I can understand the reasons to not oversize a standard boiler but if you unit is modulating and resetting on OA where is the downside?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon
    Posts
    1,209
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    Same question holds true for wanting to oversize, why?
    How about low fire rates, do they not go up with a higher peak btu unit? Kind of a silly question IMO, unless you don't mind throwing money away.
    Proud supporter of Springfield Millers and Oregon Ducks.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    10
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    Good point, but in reality 80% of 230k is 46k. I dont think you can even buy a boiler that small. Im guessing that even in the late spring and early fall most New York residents in a 4000 Sq' use more heat than that. My point is; isnt it better to have the extra capacity now for a couple of extra $ and maybey not need it or to need it and not have it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    1,196
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    You will have to size the boiler components for the max BTU's. Anyone want to buy a 1.5 or 2" Spirovent?

    Size it for the load. IF you have a 80K load now, and are going to add 20K possibly in the future, it would be foolish to get a 200K boiler.

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