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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Somers, Connecticut
    Posts
    15

    Hmm

    Hi Guy's, Thanks for the heads up on my first post about a quiet furnace with maintance in mind.

    I had to do some research on Heat Pumps before I made this post, I don't know anyone around my area of Connecticut that has one installed, that makes me a little leary.

    Heat pumps sound like a great way to go with a furnace as my backup thru the cold winter months. I have to do so more homework on these.

    My idea to go with Propane is, I can bury the 1000lb tank in the ground, One less item in my walk out basement, I can use it also for my fireplace and stove also. Oil isn't out of the question, Im just trying to figure out options.

    I would like to keep the system Simple yet efficent.
    I will spend the $50 bucks and do a Load Cal myself just for my own knowedge.

    Anyone out ther from New England area using a Duel Luel system??? Pro's/Cons??......No, Not convics!
    Brian

  2. #2
    Heat Pumps can save you tremendous amounts of money while operating above the BP (balance point).

    For more HP (heat pump) information, please search "heat pumps" on this site. There is a tremendous amount of information already posted to this site on that subject.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Gold Coast of Connecticut
    Posts
    4,664
    Thats a great way to go!
    Aire Serv of SW Connecticut- Gas heat, dual fuel and central a/c systems installed and serviced

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,440

    Thumbs up Factors

    Gas Rate $__.__ MCF
    Electric Rate $_.__ per KW

    Heat Pump H.S.P.F. ____

    Problem 70 % solved.
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    6
    i would not reccomend a heat pump around CT, since most of the winter (once it starts) is below 35 degrees.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Hockessin,DE
    Posts
    88

    agree...heat pump not a good idea for cold climes

    best option for you would be a 90% or higher furnace and 10 to 13 SEER A/c

    propane or oil - bad idea
    unless getting Nat. gas is a problem

    but if you plan to stay in this house for a long time
    look into Geo-thermal - best option for the long term

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,440

    Exclamation Specific Analysis Needed for CT !

    Originally posted by chevling
    i would not reccomend a heat pump around CT, since most of the winter (once it starts) is below 35 degrees.
    Generally, C.O.P. at 17'F is about 2.7.

    Heat pump may be the most economical NOW given INITIAL natural gas rate increases.

    I am not aware of the specific electric or natural
    gas rates in CT.
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Somers, Connecticut
    Posts
    15
    I wish Natural Gas was around the area, but it's not.

    There's about 120 days which the temp average is I believe 25f.........BBBrrrrrrr.......Why do I live here!

    So, Wouldn't those days be for my backup furnace and not my heat pump???

    Brian

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    Connecticut sure is cold....that's why I moved south.

    The whole key to your situation is the balancepoint of your house/heatpump. This is the temperature at which the heatpump can no longer maintain the setpoint of your thermostat without help(btu's) from the backup heat, propane in your case. So first you need a load calculation done, then you can choose a heatpump accordingly. I no longer am from the cold climate,so i can't help you with how well they work there, but people are installing them, so if sized accordingly they do the job. It just takes a while to get used to the heat, as they don't blow you away like a furnace,they run around 100 degrees out of the duct.
    Good luck and think twice before you bury that propane tank...that could cause future headaches/expenses.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Somers, Connecticut
    Posts
    15
    More and more builders are installing the l.p. tanks here under ground, It's probabley easier for them to do so, but it's not them paying the fuel bill's. I think L.P. is around 2 bucks a gallon.

    If "You" (hvac pro's) were building a new house in a cold climate, with not breaking the bank on a complex system, would you still go Oil?????

    I don't have access to Natural gas.

    Thanks,
    Brian

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    654
    Give oil a fair shake here, modern oil burning equipment is clean and safe. The safest form of fossil fuel in my opinion. Shopping around for fuel saves hundreds, and since there are many many oil companies vying for your business, your choice of a reputable company is plentiful.

    Don't bother with a heatpump in Connecticut, they aren't worth the cost, end of story.

    A quality hydro-air system with radiant floor warming is probably the least expensive alternative means for heating and cooling, but copper baseboard for just heating works very too, then central air can be added at a later date if you so choose.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,996
    Casturbo is right. In the NE, we heat for more then 50% of the year so why not get the best system for heat? Radiant floors and basebaord would be the most confortable and efficent. You can bury a new fiberglass oil tank or just put in a Roth saftey tank in the basement. Remember that a gallon of oil has over 1/3 more BTU's a gallon of LP. If you 're set on a gas dryer and stove then there are some fantastic 90%+ effcient gas boilers on the market. You then can keep the AC system simple and have the ductwork optimized for cooling only.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Somers, Connecticut
    Posts
    15
    Oil isn't out of the question, I didn't relize that it produces more energy than L.P.

    Can you direct vent an oil furnace??
    Brian

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