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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    central jersey
    Posts
    286
    ran line from outside meter to furnace.1 inch pipe ,black,most of the way.test guage pumped to 15 psi.had to take apart twice to finally hold pressure.use pipe dope from home depot,and all pipe and fitting as well.well its been 5 hours and guage holding steady.any suggestion if it wouldn't hold. every thing is very tight,used section of pipe on monkey wrench for added leverage,Also any info on using galvinized pipe on inside of house,told wouln't pass fire inspection,I didn't use it but would like to clear the air on this matter,I'm from NJ.One more thing normal drop due to temp drop over night 1-2 psi ok?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,743
    temp not going to drop enough to make a difference, should not be any noticeable drop. do not tighten to much, could cause problems, do not install any gascocks before pressure test. never ran galvanized inside don't know if it would be a problem.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    memphis
    Posts
    4

    section of pipe ?

    you used a section of pipe for added leverage ? it is guys like you that make it hard for guys like me , if you were to tape and dope your joints right you wouldnt need to tighten them up so much , dont get me wrong they hafta be tight but you dont hafta use extreme force to tighten them i hate having to put a cheater on to loosen someones pipe installation shoot man there aint that much pressure on them lines ..... and galvanized is for air or water or oil and not for natural gas or ammonia or any other corrosive or health hazardous materials . code enforcement will not pass a galvanized gas line install .

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    manitowoc wisconsin
    Posts
    4,943
    It is possible to overtighten fittings & pull the threads right off the pipe or fitting.You should take it all apart toss all the fittings & cut off all the threads on the pipe & start over.
    Take your time & do it right!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    657
    I use a spray bottle with soapy water and check all the connections for leaks. If it leaks you will see it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    be advised that pipe dope is a LUBRICANT, not supposed to seal, since proper threads are to seal!

    sounds like someone cut the threads too long!

    as advised, start again -- no leakage is acceptable, else = hazardous!
    harvest rainwater,make SHADE,R75/50/30= roof/wall/floor, use HVAC mastic,caulk all wall seams!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    657
    cem-bsee be advised that pipe dope is a LUBRICANT, not supposed to seal, since proper threads are to seal!

    cem-bsee I had never heard that. I thought pipe dope was refered to as thread sealant. Kind of like teflon tape. Are you really sure about that? I am not being a smart ass just curious.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    I use the blue Loctite on ALL threaded connecitons for a sealant! it also prevents corrosion -- the blue comes apart with hand tools, red must be heated = useful for resetting bearings.

    first started when riding a bicycle 100miles within 8 hours, or less -- found it hard to walk home, carrying a bike!
    harvest rainwater,make SHADE,R75/50/30= roof/wall/floor, use HVAC mastic,caulk all wall seams!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    1,196
    Home Dopeys for pipe is the first mistake. They carry the CHEAPEST asian black fittings, so I would almost expext leaks from sloppy tolerances. 1" pipe should only need a good tug on a 12" wrench with tape and dope.

    Jack up the pressure and soap up everything, including the nipple seams all along the run. Soap the gage and the air fitting too. Don't use Galv for gas.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    657
    cem-bsee
    be advised that pipe dope is a LUBRICANT, not supposed to seal, since proper threads are to seal


    Cem-bsee

    I think you are mixed up on that. This is a quote from a locktite catloge I have.
    "Locktite thread sealants seal and secure metal pipes and fitings. By filling the space between threaded metal parts, thread sealants harden to prevent leakage. Designed for low and high pressure applications, thread sealants seal instantly for low pressure testing. When fully cured, they seal to the burst strength of most piping systems."

    The red and blue are thread lockers. Those are for holding hardware that you don't want the nuts and bolts to come loose on. I use those on my R/C helicopter so that they don't shake to pieces in flight. Mainly the blue thread locker.

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