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Thread: New Heat Pump

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Henderson,KY
    Posts
    11
    I currently own a home that has 1400 sq feet in the main part of the house. It has an addition on the back with a finished basement which has 900 sq ft upstairs and including the basement. The main part of the house has a Trane XL90(85,000) btu gas furnace with an trane XL1200 2 ton condenser. The addition has a 10-13 year old carrier 75,000 btu furnace with a trane XL1200 1.5 ton condenser. well I am adding on to make way for a fourth child. We are adding a small bedroom and pantry and an attached two and a half car garage. The old garage which is 22 X 22 will be converted into a new family room (slightly vaulted ceiling). The old family room will be a dining room. I won't be heating or cooling the garage portion of the addition. However the bedroom (10 X 17) and pantry (10 X 10) will need HVAC as well as the new family room (22 X 22). The reason I am not replacing the Trane HVAC units is because they are only six years old. So finally to the question at hand. I am looking at a new heat pump for the new addition. Is there a general rule of thumb on SEER as far as bang for buck? I mean is a 16 SEER unit going to save me 50% more than a 14 SEER on heating and cooling costs? I have been looking at Trane and Carrier (I kinda figured since this is what I currently own). Is there a way to say you need 1 ton of cooling capacity for every 600 sq ft of living space? Oh yeah, the new addition is on concrete no crawl space. I hope this is enough info for an informed decision. I am also taking into account any rebates/financing by either manufacturer and at least a ten year warrenty on parts and labor. Again I am trying to consider ALL factors. I would prefer to go to a variable speed if the cost isn't out of this world. When I bought the Tranes six years ago the variable speed was double. Thanks for your help and consideration guys. Charles Abbott. One last thing this summer I had a dead short in the smaller condenser outside. HVAC contractor came over and I helped him take the cover off. The problem was some sort of heater mounted on or very near the compressor. The wire feeding this heater had been too close to the compressor, heated the insulation around them and shorted out. He replaced the burned wiring only I wonder if the entire heater should be replaced? It is under warrenty and I asked he said I didn't have to have it for the unit to work however I figured since the manufacturer designed it to be in there. Well the unit works but how do I know if the heater is working or not? Should I have another Trane dealer look at it? Just curious? Thanks again Charles.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Waco, Texas, USA
    Posts
    6,153
    If your kids are not very close in age I will help you.
    "And remember my sentimental friend......that a heart is not judged by how much you love, but by how much you are loved by others" - Wizard of Oz.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Henderson,KY
    Posts
    11

    Smile Thanks

    Thank you Mr. Wiggins. I appreciate any help or guidance you may be willing to give me. First, I like my installer. He seems to be a nice guy. That not withstanding I realize that when he checked the heater for the short it was right in the middle of August. So I am sure he was a hoppin. I was considering Trane/American Standard or Carrier. Mostly the Trane/American Standard because I already own TWO existing Trane systems. Just trying to keep the same service company. Should that heater on the condenser be checked to see if it still works? Is that a simple continuity check or is it more detailed than that? As I stated in my earlier post I was just curious what is the best route to take. I mean THREE Seperate HVAC systems!!! At first I had considered replacing the 15 year old Carrier furnance with the six year old Trane 90% furnace and it's condenser. I would have to sell the smaller Trane condenser and Carrier furnace. Then I would simply purchase a new ??? I don't know what size furnace and condenser to heat and cool half of the existing part of the house and the new addition. The problem I see here is now you have to vaccum down both condensers and move the six year old Trane 90% furnace and A Coil to the upstairs (use same refrigerant lines, six years old) and calculate square footage for proper size of new addition. The only issue I have with this strategy is will I need to replace the older return air vent ducts since I am sure this new system will need to be at least 50% larger than the existing system? What would you do? Stick with the three seperate systems? Or replace old Carrier with six year old Trane and buy one new heat pump? I sure, I am all over the road with this description. Thanks for reading another saga that is my HVAC life. Charles Abbott.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Waco, Texas, USA
    Posts
    6,153

    Re: Thanks

    Originally posted by ceabbott2
    I sure, I am all over the road with this description. Thanks for reading another saga that is my HVAC life. Charles Abbott.
    Yes, your description is very confusing. Might I suggest dividing up your questions in a 1.2.3. format. Making paragraphs would also help.

    I worry about any family that has kids close in age. They are sometimes malnutritioned and tortured for punishment. Never had a family like that where the dad was a firefighter though so you might be ok.

    Yes it would be wise to get the crankcase heater repaired.

    American Standard/Trane makes a great heat pump which I would recommend (R-22). Never have been impressed with anything Carrier made but that is only personal preference.

    Unless you just hit the lottery it sounds like your multi-layered project will be better served by a few strategicly placed heat pump window units.
    "And remember my sentimental friend......that a heart is not judged by how much you love, but by how much you are loved by others" - Wizard of Oz.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    With a larger system,you can often run additional supply and return trnk ducts from the plenum(equipment) to the addition leaving all the old duct in place.

    You could also add zoning so the addition has it's own stat and temperature control.

    You need a Manual J load calculation,to size it right,but also look at different configurations ,of how to add the new space ,new system or add on to an existing one.


    Additions and converting garages,involve making some walls/that were exterior into interior walls and sometimes eliminating windows.All this changes the btu requirements of the existing space,another reason for a load calc..

    This is also the time to look at any upgrades to insulation and windows,that can reduce the btus required.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Henderson,KY
    Posts
    11

    Smile Thanks dash

    Thanks Dash for the info. Forgive my ignorance but what is a manual J load? How is one performed and what will it tell me? Is this calculation something I can perform myself? I will definately be adding insulation everywhere. As much as I can. We are using vinyl windows with low e glass. I will try my darndest to seal up and insulate as best as I can. Another member mentioned window unit heat pumps as an alternative to having three complete systems. Are these the hotel type HVAC units? Thanks for any help. Charles Abbott.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    I think the window unit idea was in jest.

    Manual J based load calulation ,from http://www.acca.org,for reference only.Any good contractor can do it ,along with the Manual D duct design,many can't.

    You can do your own for a fee at the Red Tab,HVAC Calc,above,it's all about the square footage of walls,windows,doors,etc. and the various types and Rvalues.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,597
    listen to all of the above advice. well, most of it.

    as for the efficiency question, it will depend on your location and electric rates.

    if you live in texas, then a higher seer would be worth the additional cost. if in maine, it wouldn't.

    another option would be a ductless or mini split, these have an outdoor heat pump with wall hanging indoor coil(s).

    check out http://www.mrslim.com this is mitsubishis web site for the ductless. i saw some very attractive indoor units manufactured by LG at comfortech, but i dont believe they are available in heat pumps yet.

    good luck.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680

    Re: Re: Thanks

    Originally posted by Steve Wiggins

    I worry about any family that has kids close in age. They are sometimes malnutritioned and tortured for punishment. Never had a family like that where the dad was a firefighter though so you might be ok.
    WTH? My bother is 13 months older than I, my sister is 10mos, 10 days younger, None of us were malnurished or tortured, well... we did torture my little sister, but that was my brother and I just being boys and older.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Waco, Texas, USA
    Posts
    6,153
    I said sometimes......
    "And remember my sentimental friend......that a heart is not judged by how much you love, but by how much you are loved by others" - Wizard of Oz.

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