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  1. #1

    Smile

    On horizontal applications installed in the attics of houses, there exists a primary pan underneath the coil encased in the housing and then a secondary pan is installed directly beneath the unit if in the event the primary fails. This secondary pan is a joke. First of all it is flat bottomed but installed on a slant and second of along it does not allow for condensate to easily flow out the pvc. Rather it builds up in the pan and then rusts it. I have since started using a new product that is made of ABS(plastic) and has a sloped bottom side centerdrain that is much better. In fact all you do is connect an elbow and the 3/4 in. pvc to it and its done. Cheaper than the metal flat bottom pans. Has any other person out there wondered why we even still have flat bottomed sheet metal pans installed on these type of systems?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Coastal Georgia
    Posts
    34,902
    The secondary pan is only to be used as insurance, should be tilted to the drain and the drain line should terminate when it will tell the home owner that he or she has a problem.


    I used a couple of the ABS pans but they had tiny pin holes in them .

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
    Posts
    15,506
    Originally posted by newproductman
    is made of ABS(plastic) and has a sloped bottom side centerdrain that is much better. In fact all you do is connect an elbow and the 3/4 in. pvc to it and its done. Cheaper than the metal flat bottom pans.
    So do you craw up under the plenum to hook up the drain line?
    __________________________________________________ ____________________________
    “Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.” –Albert Einstein

    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards.”-Vernon Law

  4. #4
    Actually you do not have to crawl up under the plenum. The drain can either be in the center of the bottom panel or for ease of installation can come with as a "side bottomed drain. This way the pan need not be tilted anymore.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Coastal Georgia
    Posts
    34,902
    Are you about to SPAM drain pans you have a vested interest in ?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
    Posts
    15,506
    Is this pan on some sort of legs what holds it up off the drain line or is it suspended?
    __________________________________________________ ____________________________
    “Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.” –Albert Einstein

    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards.”-Vernon Law

  7. #7
    it's suspended on the underside of the plenum. Just like the other one was---------

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Memphis
    Posts
    2,502
    I think those pans should only be made out of metal. I did a home inspection the other day that had 2 systems. The home inspector said both pans were cracked. I go up in the attic & he was right. Both furnaces had black plastic pans under em & both were had huge cracks & gaps in em. So now I have to go in there with a couple of guys & try picking the furnace up & sliding in new pans & hooking them up.

    I've seen lots of those black plastic pans used for hot water heaters too & so many of them are cracked. Therefore any pan I ever install will be metal.
    Life is like a jar of jalapenos. What you do today might burn your ass tomorrow.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Upstate, SC
    Posts
    2,916
    Just changed out several of the abs plastic pans last month at a business. The heat in the attic had made them all so brittle that the least little pressure on them caused them to crack or break. Once I found the source of the water leak on the first unit and showed the crack in the pan to the maintenance guy, he told me to change them all out. We didn't get any of them out of the building without breaking them they were so brittle. Metal is the way to go and if it is done properly, the water won't be there long enough to rust it out. Usually a drain over a doorway or a float switch to alert the customer to the problem, or both, is the way we do it around here.

    Bobby

  10. #10
    My setup is an ABS black pan with a condensate pump set in it. If the pump overflows into the pan a float switch shuts off the compressor outside. Hope it works like it should if all fails.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Upstate, SC
    Posts
    2,916
    If it is in an attic, the heat will breakdown the plastic in the pan and make it very brittle over time. Until then, you should be fine.

    Bobby

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,597
    i wouldn't want a condensate pump in an attic in Boston. you may have freezing issues. where does this pump drain? do you empty it after ac season? is this a condensing furnace that will utilize the pump during winter?

  13. #13
    I'm going to fill it with antifreeze this weekend as AC is now done for the season. And it isn't a condensing heat unit - its an aquacoil hyrdronic system. That should work right?

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