Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 27 to 37 of 37

Thread: Confused in KC

  1. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    east kansas
    Posts
    8,032
    If you go with a dual capacity outdoor unit, then you must use a variable speed drive in your indoor unit. The reason, Too much airflow on low capacity. And in the Kansas City area you will not dehumidify on low capacity. Your indoor coil will be too warm.

    Lennox has good products.

    I thought the new trend with heat pumps was not to turn them off in the winter. Even though they will not heat the house when it is too cold outside, they still will transfer heat to be used with the electric back up. Any thoughts?

    Beware of advice given by some guy on the Internet.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tyler TX
    Posts
    676
    Originally posted by lynn rodenmayer
    If you go with a dual capacity outdoor unit, then you must use a variable speed drive in your indoor unit. The reason, Too much airflow on low capacity. And in the Kansas City area you will not dehumidify on low capacity. Your indoor coil will be too warm.

    Lennox has good products.

    I thought the new trend with heat pumps was not to turn them off in the winter. Even though they will not heat the house when it is too cold outside, they still will transfer heat to be used with the electric back up. Any thoughts?

    You can save money running them all the way down to near a COP 1. I'm not sure where most unit reach COP1 but its near 0 deg.
    HVAC Contractor, Tyler Texas.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    96
    Dpatty,

    Which thermostat did you install on your Lennox 18 Seer heat pump with electric auxiliary backup?

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    96
    Dpatty,

    Disregard my last question. I just went back and reviewed your previous response and figured out my answer.

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    96
    I have already decided to go with a variable speed blower so my next decision will be whether I want to spend the extra money for the dual stage compressor. Your point is well taken if I was planning to go with the dual stage compressor and a constant speed blower.

    If I can run my heat pump down to 0 degrees would it be true that I won't be running my auxilary heat very often. If thats the case than maybe it makes sense to get a gas furnace so that I have the option to run on gas if the electric companies choose to raise their rates to get even with the gas companies. Maybe I'm just being to cautious and should just go all electric as many of you have recommended?


  6. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tyler TX
    Posts
    676
    If you go with the electric strips option the heat pump can at the same time where as with a gas furnace they cannot. With your cost of electric this may be your best option. What happens with tis is the heat strips will just act like the last stage heat. this would make your heating seamless you may never realize they were on.

    Although I like the Lennox, Trane/AS make comparable units and are of high quality. Carrier/Byant makes comparable units as well but have never delt with them to know about the quality, the infinity controler does sound nice. There may be others out there but those seem to be the best known. Just be sure to hire a good contractor to install it and I'm sure you will be fine

    It's funny, I'm surrounded by power plants and I pay quite a bit more for electricity.
    HVAC Contractor, Tyler Texas.

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    1,482
    Choose your thermostat carefully as staging becomes very important with the systems you are looking at. Some programmable thermostats will immediately bring on auxiliary heat when recovering from a set back period. If you are going all electric, I would suggest a non programmable thermostat with a .5 degree differential for auxiliary heat so the thermostat will keep the indoor temperature close to desired setpoint when the heat pump is losing ground. Set it and forget it. A mechanical 3 degree differential thermostat will bump the heat strips on and off to maintain the differential if the heat pump cannot satisfy the call for heat when it is below say 15 degrees. This creates an uncomfortable house whose heating system runs constantly.

  8. #34
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,415
    I've always been an American Standard/Trane guy myself, but I will admit that other brands are just as good (but likely not better).

    You can run the heat pump no matter the temp, they will all produce heat well below the coldest temp you'll ever see (and colder than the coldest temp I'll ever see here in South Dakota too). Typically the HP will keep running, cycling the strips on and off as needed. If you have a 2 stage HP 1st stage will likely run most of the time once it gets cold enough for a coat, cycling 2nd stage as needed. Once it gets even colder then 2nd stage will keep running and cycle the strips.

    If you use a gas furnace for back up, once it gets around the temp where the heat pump cant keep up, it shuts off and you run off of the furnace only. Not that it's a bad thing, but the whole reason of having a heat pump (efficiency) goes away when the furnace is on.

    Unless you have a really wierdly wired house, a 200 amp box will be more than enough to run everything. Usually 30-40 amps for the outdoor unit. Around the same or slighty more for the heat strips and you're set.

    One thing to keep in mind though, if you're switching to all electric you'll need to get an electric water heater and stove if you don't have one already.

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    96
    I have an electric stove already. Why can't I continue to run my water heater with the gas?????

  10. #36
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,415
    Well, you could..... but if you go all electric you can't.. *not beating a dead horse lol*

    In my area to get a good rate on the electrical you can't run gas for anything. I dunno why, but I guess it's thier way to corner the market.

    The one thing to look out for if you continue to run the water heater off gas is the venting for it. It might have to have a chimney liner installed to make it continue to vent properly.

    Sorry bout the confusion

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    96
    My vent for my gas furnace and water heater run directly through my attic to a roof vent. Do you see any problem with this if I indeed decide to go all electric with the furnace.

    I will check with my utility to see if I have to go "all" electric to catch any breaks. My understanding is that all I have to do is go to an electric heat pump and I will get the break.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event