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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    11
    Hi,this is my first post. I researched this forum for a few hours and was hoping some of you good people could answer a few questions for me.

    First, I too was one of those people who was going to ask which furnace is the best. After reading several threads here, I've discovered that it's all about the installation. If you have a good installer, he could make almost anything work.

    As far as my question and I hope I don't have this mixed up. I'm lookig at Bryant's Evolution line (same as Carriers Infinity line). They have the 90i and the 80v. Both are two stage variables. My understanding with variable furnaces (I may be wrong) is that they use a mechanical filter box. The heat is sucked back in through the intakes (I have one upstairs and one down stairs) and filterd through the box. This helps eliminate some of the germs and allergens in the house. I'm guessing that it won't work in the bedrooms upstairs since I don't have any
    separate intakes inside the house. Then the heat is returned and distrubted evenly in the house. I'm told that I can also save around $150 on my electric bill a year with a variable speed furnace because it runs on DC power instead of AC power (It will run constantly).

    Is this a gimmick or does it really work. I could just go with a plain Bryant 80t which is a two stage furance. Any input is greatly appreciated. I've learned a lot just in this forum and am still learing. Ultimately, I may have to decide if I want to get a 90% Bryant furance which is $1300 more than the 80v. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    11
    Oops, forgot to ask one question.

    I got two estimates from reputable dealers. One said that my current Payne heat exchanger most likely went out because no one ever came to "tune up" the furnace during the first year. He said usually toward the end of the first year, the furnace blows hot and the burners need to be adjusted. He said his company would come out for free and do this later on in the year. The other estimator never heard of this and said that it wasn't necessary. A Trane estimator also came and never mentioned this (I never asked either). Is there any truth to this. Thanks again.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Dothan, Al
    Posts
    3,453
    Originally posted by bnbhoha
    I'm told that I can also save around $150 on my electric bill a year with a variable speed furnace because it runs on DC power instead of AC power (It will run constantly).


    Richard: The savings between a standard & variable speed would not be noticable on yur electric bill - the variable speed is for comfort mainly. I don't recommend variable myself, due to purchase cost and repair cost. I personally don't believe they are worth the money under any conditions - but thats MHO. No way the contractor should quote savings figures.




    Ultimately, I may have to decide if I want to get a 90% Bryant furance which is $1300 more than the 80v. Thanks
    [/B]

    Again,due to initial cost and repair costs, I don't think ( MHO ) that the 90% will ever bayback the difference.


    Respectfully,
    Richard

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    33,934
    Though we normally don't talk price, is that $1300 diff for 2 systems or 1? If 2, there could be some savings after a few years. If 1, would be a long wait except at the North Pole! You might find the savings on constant fan with VS compared to standard motor even more than $150 per unit but that applies to either furnace. If you are going Bryant, be sure to get the Evolution control to take full advantage of what the furnace can do.

    [Edited by BaldLoonie on 10-19-2005 at 07:56 AM]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    296

    Can you provide more information?

    bnbhoha; As BaldLoonie tactfully mentioned, please no dollar amounts... Also please help the Forum help you: What is the climate of your residence, it is an important variable. Does Air Conditioning enter into the mix? If so it may control the "size" of the air distribution system, thus needs to be considered. Another thought is fossil fuel costs are not forecast to decrease therefore a Dual Fuel mix (Heat PumP/Furnace) may be to your decided advantage. Many other variables to consider, take your time, study and ask more questions since this is a major purchase and you'll be living with your choice for some time. BTW: You're absolutely correct, it is the installation that can make the most humble unit a winner. Be certain you get references and study each contract carefully. Warranty lenghts are a good diagnostic for quality (both parts and labor) make sense?

    Please keep up the good research efforts...

    God Bless

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Central Kansas
    Posts
    1,145
    My question is, will you actually be running the furnace blower constantly? We have a few clients who do this, but this is their choice.

    "I can also save around $150 on my electric bill a year with a variable speed furnace because it runs on DC power instead of AC power (It will run constantly)."

    You do not HAVE to run the blower constantly, but you may choose to do so for air quality reasons, to break up stale feeling air in a multi-level home, blend more even temperatures from room to room, etc. If you choose to operate the blower 24/7, you will indeed see significant savings on electrical consumption, likely more than what you were quoted. We have customers who have verified that with their utility bills.

    Bryant offers two 'compromise' models- the Preferred series in both 90+ (352MAV or AAV) & 80+ (312AAV) AFUE. These both have the two stage gas valves, but standard PSC motors for a savings in installed cost. I believe two stage or modulating gas valves go a long, long way to improving comfort and variable speed just adds more to the overall performance.

    If you are in a climate with serious winters, consider going with a 90+ AFUE for gas consumption savings. And, if you choose to operate the blower continuously, consider the variable speed blower if for no other reason, due to lowered electrical consumption.
    Don't confuse me with facts, my mind is already made up.

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