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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    9
    I want to run a new return on an addition to my house (new heat was added but no new returns!). I want to pan out along joists to the new section, but to get from where I want to connect to the return trunk to where I want the return register, I need to shift along the route from one joist to its neighbor. Is there an existing connector out there to do this. Essentially, I want to drop down, over and back up to the neighboring joist.

    thanks for any help

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    17,960
    Sounds like you need to have some panning made up to cross over. Either that, or chop the joist out.
    Behind the ostensible government sits enthroned an invisible government owing no allegiance and acknowledging no responsibility to the people.

    Theodore Roosevelt

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    67
    I wouldn't "chop" the joist out.

    There is a formula for the size and amount of holes that you can drill or cut into a joist. Find out what that is and then drill those holes out. You might have to do it over a 6 or 8 foot span. Follow me?

    Or you could go to a tin basher and have that connector made that you were talking about. It would be pretty simple to do it either way. The only problem with the connector is you would lose some head room.........but that may not be a concern that you have.

    North

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Suppy NC
    Posts
    4,513
    ost bays are 14 by 8 or 10
    a piece of duct with both ends capped off
    cut the top out beam to beam and put it up to the bays you are jumping. beam caps will be need to seal the open side of the bay

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    17,960

    Talking

    Just kidding about chopping the joist
    Behind the ostensible government sits enthroned an invisible government owing no allegiance and acknowledging no responsibility to the people.

    Theodore Roosevelt

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Yeah no chopping....... but a bunch of 2" holes might be ok. As mentioned you cant go crazy with them.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Derby City
    Posts
    3,964
    Geesh guys, did everybody forget what to call a 'jumper?' I wouldn't suggest a DIY start hackin' away at ANY structural support of the home. There are proper ways to accomplish this and a competent contractor can provide you the proper method and size you need. I don't know about the rest of you, but this is a fairly common practice here when plumbing, or joist direction, creates the need to 'jump' from one joist space to another. Let's see, lose headroom............or...............affect structural integrity of home. Lemme think............
    Everyone has a purpose in life..........even if it's to be a bad example.

    Seek first to understand, before seeking to be understood.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Round holes (not square)per an engineer (let him tell you) dont jeopordize the integrity of the joists but Jumper ducts do increase the static, they are loaded with equivilent feet. A 3 foot jumper duct could, without looking, equal as much as 50 feet of duct.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    9
    Thanks for the help. I don't have a head room issue and I don't want to touch the joists. I like the section of duct with the ends capped and the top open suggestion.
    thanks again for the ideas...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Derby City
    Posts
    3,964
    cobra: for the record, that is referred to in the industry as a 'jumper.'

    Doc. you tellin me that a 3' jumper is equivilent to 50' of straight duct....... on a return?
    Everyone has a purpose in life..........even if it's to be a bad example.

    Seek first to understand, before seeking to be understood.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Its not the duct, per say, it's the restriction and turbulance caused by 4 90 deg turns with no vanes that gives it the same restriction as 50 feet of duct. (it may be 30 it may be 70). And yes, thats what I am saying.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Derby City
    Posts
    3,964
    fair enough. Thanks Doc.
    Everyone has a purpose in life..........even if it's to be a bad example.

    Seek first to understand, before seeking to be understood.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    tip of the mitt
    Posts
    1,974
    We usually fabricate a "pan" with a open top and the ends at a 45 degree. I don't much care for duct capped on each end. In a pinch we sometimes make a jumper out of 2X6 lumber with the ends cut at a 45 degree and then nail panning on the bottom. It depends on the situation.
    I have my own little world. But it's OK...they know me here.

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