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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    59

    Sealed or open bearings?

    What makes someone choose sealed opposed to open bearings?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,108
    The main factors are the type of load that is on the bearing, the type of lubrication, and the severity of duty and environment.
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    59
    So a 300 hp, 6000 gpm pump that runs for a month or so at a time with a day or two rest in an indoor application has seal bearings on the motor and open bearings on the pump. Sound right?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,108
    Not necessarily. The best way to find out what you have is to contact the manufacturer or look the numbers up on the web for yourself.
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    59
    The equipment is over thirty years old and the manufacturer spec is hard to find. The management in my building has allowed too many people to touch the equipment and now I have identical pumps with differantntypes of filters, bearingrgns etc...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,108
    Normally the bearing numbers are stamped on the nameplate of the motor and sometimes on the pump.

    If you have something else installed, then you can either A) wait for failure and then go back with OEM, or B) tear it down to see what you have in there and then go back with OEM.

    Many pumps have open-faced ball bearings, but that is not always the case. It depends on the construction of the pump. Could be anything in the motor...
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    59
    You lean on OEM parts All the time? Even if the equipment is 30 years old?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,108
    I do whenever I can. Especially when the equipment is 30 years old. A 300 hp motor and a large pump like you describe isn't something I would take chances with, especially if replacement was not in the forseeable future.

    There are times when there are acceptable alternatives or availability is an issue. Cost is not usually a deciding factor.

    I could really launch into a rant right now, but I will spare you.
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

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