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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    South/East Michigan
    Posts
    24
    My furnace guy game over today and cleaned out all the drywall dust and replaced the thermal coupler and a few other annual things. I discussed w/ him the age of my furnace (1987) and if I should consider replacing it due to the fact that gas prices are going to leap this year. He didn't get really pushy and kind of took a stance of "if it isn't broke don't fix it"... but at the same time "newer furnaces are more more efficient"... He said everything checked out good and it's just something I need to decide if I want to do now (which would save me some cash in the long run) or wait until I need to.

    In the past 12 months I have used about 975.0 CCF worth of natural gas which was under $1000 for the last 12 months... However, this winter I'm concerned w/ the fact that Michigan State Officials are predicting that gas prices will be rising about 40%... With that fact, I'm thinking it might be time to replace my 17-18 year old furnace. He was pushing a 80% efficient furnace and seeing my A/C was installed in 1997 (two years before I moved it), I really wouldn't need to replace it... It was very very reasonable... For about 15% more, I can get a 90% efficient furnace...

    I figure that I would want the high efficient furnace... Even with gas prices on the rise this year, how do I justify spending the cash on a furnace? I just need a little push in the right direction on wether or not I should spend the cash this year.

    Oh, and my furnace guy quoted me a WeatherKing 90RJ which is 90% Efficient and a WeatherKing which is 80% efficient. From what I've read on the forum, WeatherKing is a decent "builders" furnace if I'm looking at budget and reliability... Would I do better buying something a little better?

    Thanks!
    Bill

    [Edited by spacescape on 10-14-2005 at 09:24 PM]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    S.W. PA
    Posts
    3,298
    ok first off figure that you can save around 20% by going with a 90+ just a guess could be a little more or less so you have all the numbers and know how long it would take to pay for itsself and would it be worth it to you to spend more now to save in the long run?


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Richmond
    Posts
    480
    If you want the best in comfort, check out the Carrier Infinity. Do a search for Infinty on this site and you will see what I mean.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Gaylord, Michigan
    Posts
    729
    Gas prices are just going to continue to rise. No one can say exactly how much. But with the volatile market, severe weather & demand increases there is no doubt about it.

    Replacing your furnace is worth serious consideration. And a 90+ is the direction that you want to go in. The savings are going to be there. But how long it will take to see a return on your investment, is a good question. Again depending on the market, it could be anything.

    Your first concern with any heating system should be your comfort. Followed closely by effiecency.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    84
    2 Words my friend: Heat Pump.
    "Dodge is a damn fine car. Ran over my wife with a Dodge" - Zeke, Married with children

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Gaylord, Michigan
    Posts
    729
    Originally posted by river_t
    2 Words my friend: Heat Pump.
    Dual Fuel

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    South/East Michigan
    Posts
    24
    Originally posted by dhvac
    ok first off figure that you can save around 20% by going with a 90+ just a guess could be a little more or less so you have all the numbers and know how long it would take to pay for itsself and would it be worth it to you to spend more now to save in the long run?

    See, this is what concerns me... "IF" the prices stay the same, it would take me 5-7 years to break even... But if they go up 40%, it might still be worth it...

    Thanks.

  8. #8
    Unfortunately this is a sticking point between myself and ALL of my customers. We can't help you decide which type of person you are. You are either type A (likes to spend little up front, cares less about savings later) or you are type B (will spend more now and eagerly anticipate the savings).

    You have to make this decision, which type of person are you?

    Just remember, it's only a purchase you make about every twenty years, so an extra grand is not the end of the world (in perspective to other life expenses)

    In my opinion, I would buy the 90%er.

    One other point: if you are not the type of person who has your things regularly maintained, DON'T buy the 90%er.

    [Edited by ryan_the_furnace_guy on 10-14-2005 at 09:45 PM]

  9. #9
    Originally posted by ryan_the_furnace_guy
    One other point: if you are not the type of person who has your things regularly maintained, DON'T buy the 90%er.
    Why not?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,109
    WeatherKing is a great value in a furnace. Simple units, quite a bit less than similar units in the Rheem name. You can spend more and get 2 stage or even the variable input Mod which blows away anything else in heating comfort. But at a price $$$.

    Yes, dual fuel is a good idea, even in Michigan. Would it pay to take out a late A/C model unit? Hard to say. Might first update the furnace to a 90+ and see how you like your bills. Then as the A/C gets more age, think about changing to a heat pump.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,935
    Go with the 90% furnace.
    When its time to replace the a/c, get a heat pump instead.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  12. #12
    Originally posted by jultzya
    Originally posted by ryan_the_furnace_guy
    One other point: if you are not the type of person who has your things regularly maintained, DON'T buy the 90%er.
    Why not?
    I guess my thinking was: if you don't maintain it, you are wrecking a furnace that costs more.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    172
    Originally posted by ryan_the_furnace_guy
    Originally posted by jultzya
    Originally posted by ryan_the_furnace_guy
    One other point: if you are not the type of person who has your things regularly maintained, DON'T buy the 90%er.
    Why not?
    I guess my thinking was: if you don't maintain it, you are wrecking a furnace that costs more.
    What about the fact too that if they don't maintain them such as simple filter changes, they would be looking at a plugged up secondary exchanger and the chance of damage to the HX.

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