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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Yuma, AZ
    Posts
    2,361
    Quote Originally Posted by hikergirl View Post
    ....I do have three questions for you, though: 1) There are 2 bundles of wires coming from the air handler and 1 bundle coming from the condensate pump. There are a total of 13 wire nuts on these bundles. I'm concerned that the wires are exposed. Should they be? The company said there's not enough room for them in the air handler??? The connections should be made inside of a covered electrical box. 2) The way the shut-off was installed really creates a problem for me - it was not installed on the main duct above the air handler, as the old one was but on the back of the housing for the air intake. There is a space between the air handler and the air intake housing. Behind there I keep a number of tall items, such as 1/4-round, fluorescent tubes, etc. Now I have to be extremely careful when removing anything, as all the wiring for the shut-off is draped across that area. Does this sound right to you? It might be right as far as code is concerned but it is not courteous or thoughtful to you. Talk to them. Say, "please". 3) Once the condensate pump shuts off, the pump housing may be empty of water but the drain line is still full of water. What will become of that water when I turn over to heat? Am I going to have to disassemble the drain line to remove the water? It will eventually evaporate leaving little residue...
    Make sure that the city or county inspects the work. A permit is required so ask about this too. The disconnect should be easily accessible. The inspector would evaluate its location as it is a safety issue.

    The company wants a happy customer, so talk to them about your concerns. "A little sugar makes the medicine go down".
    "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education."
    Mark Twain
    More at: http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/education/

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    10

    These crooks need to burnnnnnnnnn!

    Lynn - I have attached a pic of the sorry excuse for a wiring job on my air handler. A permit was finally purchased and the inspector (a friend of the salesman's) came by and said, "It's a Code 2, low voltage wiring. There's nothing wrong with it."
    Apparently, someone told the salesman (inspector?), this morning, the unit was to have a float switch installed on the auxiliary drain line (the one without a red cap). It was wired, along with the condensate pump, and another wire nut was affixed. The State requires any person doing this type of electrical work to have a license for minimal electric work - I wonder if the salesman has one? I'm going to guess not.
    Prior to this float switch being installed, I had already told the salesman that the condensate pump had to go, because the water is sitting in about 50' of tubing, which will not drain (it goes up, into the ceiling, across, and down the outside wall to the ground), and there is/was nothing wrong with the gravity-fed pvc line that goes directly outside. He said he wants me to be a happy lady - I'm still waiting.
    I have included these quotes, because the water is not going to evaporate in a line that is hanging vertically upward, then running horizontal, before it runs vertically downward: "Once the condensate pump shuts off, the pump housing may be empty of water but the drain line is still full of water. What will become of that water when I turn over to heat? Am I going to have to disassemble the drain line to remove the water? 'It will eventually evaporate leaving little residue...'"
    I am going to have do more research to find out what the electrical code in TN is, as it relates to this wiring mess. To me, this is totally unacceptable.
    Do you have any words to make me feel better about this? I am really steaming mad
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  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Yuma, AZ
    Posts
    2,361
    Quote Originally Posted by hikergirl View Post
    Lynn - I have attached a pic of the sorry excuse for a wiring job on my air handler. A permit was finally purchased and the inspector (a friend of the salesman's) came by and said, "It's a Code 2, low voltage wiring. There's nothing wrong with it." It is not unsafe or against code as it is 24 volt control wiring. It is ugly.
    Apparently, someone told the salesman (inspector?), this morning, the unit was to have a float switch installed on the auxiliary drain line (the one without a red cap). It was wired, along with the condensate pump, and another wire nut was affixed. The State requires any person doing this type of electrical work to have a license for minimal electric work - I wonder if the salesman has one? I'm going to guess not. Every state is different.
    Prior to this float switch being installed, I had already told the salesman that the condensate pump had to go, because the water is sitting in about 50' of tubing, which will not drain (it goes up, into the ceiling, across, and down the outside wall to the ground), and there is/was nothing wrong with the gravity-fed pvc line that goes directly outside. He said he wants me to be a happy lady - I'm still waiting. Odd that they used a pump when there was a suitable gravity drain. I expect that they will make this change although it would be nice of them to commit to it and schedule it for the fall season.
    I have included these quotes, because the water is not going to evaporate in a line that is hanging vertically upward, then running horizontal, before it runs vertically downward: "Once the condensate pump shuts off, the pump housing may be empty of water but the drain line is still full of water. What will become of that water when I turn over to heat? Am I going to have to disassemble the drain line to remove the water? 'It will eventually evaporate leaving little residue...'"
    I am going to have do more research to find out what the electrical code in TN is, as it relates to this wiring mess. To me, this is totally unacceptable.
    Do you have any words to make me feel better about this? A contractor who values his customer relationship would accommodate this change in wiring even though code does not require it. It never hurts to say, "Please." I am really steaming mad
    Always try sugar first.
    "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education."
    Mark Twain
    More at: http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/education/

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    568

    Exclamation

    Quote Originally Posted by hikergirl View Post
    Lynn - I have attached a pic of the sorry excuse for a wiring job on my air handler. A permit was finally purchased and the inspector (a friend of the salesman's) came by and said, "It's a Code 2, low voltage wiring. There's nothing wrong with it."
    Apparently, someone told the salesman (inspector?), this morning, the unit was to have a float switch installed on the auxiliary drain line (the one without a red cap). It was wired, along with the condensate pump, and another wire nut was affixed. The State requires any person doing this type of electrical work to have a license for minimal electric work - I wonder if the salesman has one? I'm going to guess not.
    Prior to this float switch being installed, I had already told the salesman that the condensate pump had to go, because the water is sitting in about 50' of tubing, which will not drain (it goes up, into the ceiling, across, and down the outside wall to the ground), and there is/was nothing wrong with the gravity-fed pvc line that goes directly outside. He said he wants me to be a happy lady - I'm still waiting.
    I have included these quotes, because the water is not going to evaporate in a line that is hanging vertically upward, then running horizontal, before it runs vertically downward: "Once the condensate pump shuts off, the pump housing may be empty of water but the drain line is still full of water. What will become of that water when I turn over to heat? Am I going to have to disassemble the drain line to remove the water? 'It will eventually evaporate leaving little residue...'"
    I am going to have do more research to find out what the electrical code in TN is, as it relates to this wiring mess. To me, this is totally unacceptable.
    Do you have any words to make me feel better about this? I am really steaming mad
    basically those wires are low voltage wires, and the way that a/h is designed
    those wires are connected out side the cabinet. i've seen that many times, where people would even call that a normal install, i do see wire nuts attached witch is good! as far as code, ahh, but if the low voltage wiring really bothers you, you could ask the installer, to put them in a 1900 box, with a cover, so you can't see the wires! jmo. but obviously every local is differant, and in tennessee, they may have there own rules and i couldn't comment on that as i don't live in the davey crockett, state, though i've been to lavergne tenn, 10 miles south of nashville, when ICP, had there training center there! good luck!

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    10

    Still fighting with installer

    Lynn:
    If I need to start a new thread, I'm certain someone will let me know.
    The installers needed to remove the condensate pump & tubing, which was done BUT, they left the gravity-fed line leaking at the first elbow off the a/h.
    They were to put the wire pigtails in a box; it was put inside the a/h. OK
    A gaping hole was left in the outside wall, where the tubing was removed. Nice open door for all the critters in East TN.
    The guy who came to remedy some of the problems refused to address the broken driveway cap caused by the installers parking the huge truck on the driveway cap for an entire day.
    The black insulation that wraps around a large copper tube coming from the air handler has a large, jagged split around the lower end where it attaches to the a/h. I've already used all the electrical tape I had trying to bring the insulation together. I'll finish the rest later.
    I was given one set of #s, i.e. SEER & EER from installer, another from the manufacturer, and another from AHRI Certified. I have contacted the manufacturer to find out if they know anything about this.
    I have filed a complaint (8/16/11) and amended complaint (9/8/11) with the BBB. I have attempted to contact the BBB re: amended complaint, via email - will wait on their reply.
    And - I have copious notes, should they become legally necessary.
    Sorry - I just need to sound off to someone who might understand a little of what I am going through with these crooks

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    10

    I forgot to ask...

    ... one of the circuit breakers was removed, at the time of install (this newer unit is not supposed to require as much electricity). The space was left open. Should I be concerned? I thought there was a blank insert that could be used to fill the open space? It seems dangerous - to me. Your thoughts, please. Thanks.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,473
    I have an estimate for a 3-ton Amana ASZ14, which has a 2-stage compressor.
    I haven't seen this addressed but maybe it was. The ASZ14 isn't 2 stage. It's just a full feature version of the SSZ14.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Yuma, AZ
    Posts
    2,361
    Quote Originally Posted by hikergirl View Post
    ... one of the circuit breakers was removed, at the time of install (this newer unit is not supposed to require as much electricity). The space was left open. Should I be concerned? I thought there was a blank insert that could be used to fill the open space? There is. It seems dangerous - to me. Your thoughts, please. Thanks.
    That is a safety violation of the electrical code. Try the "please" approach first. Was there a permit issued and inspection done for this work? Stuffing the low voltage wiring into the air handler cabinet may have created a safety issue, as the "skinny" thermostat wires are not rated to be enclosed with high voltage wiring. The inspector could check that if the inspector is sharp.

    Except for the water leak. the other complaints are minor and easily correctable.

    So that all the problems can be addressed in one trip, do a walkthrough before and after the corrective work.
    "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education."
    Mark Twain
    More at: http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/education/

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