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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Warnerville, NY
    Posts
    3
    I own a cape-style house that was built on a slab, and currently have an lp wall heater with electric baseboards to supplement. I would like to upgrade to an lp forced hot-air system, however, with no basement, space is at a premium.

    My original thought was to put the new furnace upstairs, run the ductwork behind the kneewalls and install the vents through the ceiling of the downstairs rooms. There is currently no ductwork in the house, and I am on a tight budget. I have contacted a few HVAC installers in my area including Home Depot, Sears, etc. for quotes. Should I also contact independent HVAC installers?

    Is placing the furnace upstairs a good idea? What other options do I have? Can someone suggest furnace options and/or economical alternatives? My LP gas bill was running around $300/mo and my electric bill was about the same. The house is well insulated as it was originally built for electric heat, and is about 1700 sq. ft.

    Any suggestions and/or comments would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    S.W. PA
    Posts
    3,298
    Originally posted by mumpspro




    and I am on a tight budget.

    I have contacted a few HVAC installers in my area including Home Depot, Sears, etc. for quotes.
    wrong direction already


    Originally posted by mumpspro


    Should I also contact independent HVAC installers?




    ummmm yea

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bartlett, IL
    Posts
    6,619
    Well, expect to spend some $$$$ if you want to install a complete system and have it done correctly, I really don't know what a tight budget means, either you can afford it or you can't.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Derby City
    Posts
    3,957

    Hmm

    legitimate post? this house was built with baseboard electric and an lp wall furnace? The electric baseboard supplements? You telling me that your lp wall furnace heats this entire house? or was originally designed to?

    Also, worthy of noting, Home Depot and Sears are NOT, I repeat NOT HVAC installers. They job out ALL that work to third parties.

    If I want a craftsman tool, I'll go to Sears. If I want HVAC, uh, then I'll go to an HVAC contractor.

    short post; big on contradictions.
    Everyone has a purpose in life..........even if it's to be a bad example.

    Seek first to understand, before seeking to be understood.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Warnerville, NY
    Posts
    3
    Mr Llyod - This is a legitimate post - I can attach pictures of my house (with both the electric baseboards and LP wall heater in the livingroom) if you so desire...

    This is my first house, and unfortunately I don't have to knowledge on this type of thing or I wouldn't be asking. The LP wall heater does heat the entire house as long as the bedroom doors are left open. I'm not sure if the house was designed for this or not, but the electric baseboards and LP wall heater were both in the house when I bought it a few years ago.

    As far as the tight budget goes, I want to have the system installed correctly, however I can't spend $5000 doing it...what kind of money do you think it would be to install a complete system? I have no idea what to expect in cost...

    What other information would be useful to assist with my search? I was hoping to get some answers from this site, and thus far, am only getting bashed for my questions...very disappointing...

    Thanks,

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Gaylord, Michigan
    Posts
    729
    It is most likely the house was built with electric baseboard, and someone added the wall furnace because they were sick of the cost of operating the electric.

    Where are you located?

    Putting a forced air system into an existing house on a slab would be a difficult thing to do right. If you were in a northern climate I would steer away from using the attic/knee walls for the ductwork. Even insulated there is going to be some heat loss which in turn will produce ice on your roof. And possible damage.

    The best choice would probably be hot water baseboard. Though even getting the baseboard radiation run could be tricky, with no crawl to use.

    I kind of doubt that you would get a quality system for the amount that you are willing to spend.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Warnerville, NY
    Posts
    3
    I live in upstate NY.

    Thanks for the info and caution related to running the ducts in the knee walls...

    What type of heat would you recommend in thnis type of situation?


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