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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Plattsburgh NY
    Posts
    222
    Is there a coversion between compressor btus to comp. horsepower?

  2. #2
    A comp will pump a different amount of btu's for every different SST it's used for. No conversion.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Plattsburgh NY
    Posts
    222
    What's an SST?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Medford Oregon
    Posts
    807
    what is normally called an R22 5 HP compressor
    can produce anyhere from 18,000 btuh to 72,000 btuh
    depending on conditions which are
    1. Condensing Temp
    2. Evap temp (saturated suction temp - SST)

    so sorry, no conversion HP to BTUH
    Copeland says HP not a factor in compressor design
    I think they are telling the truth

    you need to look at a curve sheet to understand
    this. A Copeland wholesaler will have curve sheets
    or you can register at http://www.copeland-corp.com and
    download their compressor calculator.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Plattsburgh NY
    Posts
    222
    Thanks alot man. I've been to copeland's site, I think it could have been designed better, tough to navigate.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    373

    rule of thumb

    rule of thumb, and is rough only, 1 hp to 1 ton for air conditioning, 1 ton to 2 hp refrigeration, and 1 ton to 3 hp for freezer
    hem

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Monmouth Junction-NJ-USA
    Posts
    6,038
    Professionals do not use "Rule of Thumb", they use specifics.
    If you really know how it works, you have an execellent chance of fixin' er up!

    Tomorrow is promised to no one...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5

    HP<->TONS

    Try to think of it as compression/ratio. Is it harder to compress 2-1 or 9-1 ? Thus, HP. If you are comprssing, let's say, R22, in a walk-in,from 50 deg to 110 degs the diff. is 60. If you are going from 30 to 110 the diff. is 80. Give or take given entropy/enthapy curves... it takes more power to move the juice from 9-1 than from 2-1.

    m

    [Edited by michael3 on 10-11-2005 at 08:44 PM]

  9. #9

    Re: HP<->TONS

    Originally posted by michael3
    Try to think of it as compression/ratio. Is it harder to compress 2-1 or 9-1 ? Thus, HP. If you are comprssing, let's say, R22, in a walk-in,from 50 deg to 110 degs the diff. is 60. If you are going from 30 to 110 the diff. is 80. Give or take given entropy/enthapy curves... it takes more power to move the juice from 9-1 than from 2-1.

    m
    That's cool how you took 3 different ideas to confuse it some more.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215

    Re: Re: HP<->TONS

    Originally posted by jerrycoolsaz
    Originally posted by michael3
    Try to think of it as compression/ratio. Is it harder to compress 2-1 or 9-1 ? Thus, HP. If you are comprssing, let's say, R22, in a walk-in,from 50 deg to 110 degs the diff. is 60. If you are going from 30 to 110 the diff. is 80. Give or take given entropy/enthapy curves... it takes more power to move the juice from 9-1 than from 2-1.

    m
    That's cool how you took 3 different ideas to confuse it some more.
    ROTFLMAOPMP.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    where the beer flows like wine
    Posts
    2,871
    lets take another approach, 1hp=746 watts, 1watt=3.412 btu
    746x3.412=2545.352btus. this only applies to the heat output of the motor.

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