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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    8
    I am in the process of adding heat to my garage. Due to the layout of my house, it is cost prohibitive for me to add gas heat, so I am going to install a 240-volt heater, somewhere between 25,000 and 35,000 BTU's, with a horizontal air throw. The units I am looking at are about a 20-inch cube, and would mount to the back wall or hang from the ceiling. My garage is 22 x 24 x 9, and not well insulated.

    I have found a couple of different brands - namely Dayton and Modine - who make what I am looking for. However, in poking around the internet, I have not found much in the way of reviews of various electric heaters. Are there types or brands you would recommend? Are any more reliable than others?

    Thanks for help!


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,042
    If you are going to use the garage a lot, the operating cost of a heater like you describe isn't going to be great. You might consider radiant electric heaters instead; they will let you focus the heat more where you need it and not try to actually heat the space and everything in it so much.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    66,808
    What is your electric rate.

    Your talking about a heat that uses 10kw an hour.

    I wouldn't recommemd a convention unit either, wyounger is right about radiant for a garage.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,642
    if you are going to frequently use this heater running gas line under ground may be worh it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    8
    Thanks for the replies. To answer a couple of questions to help those helping me:

    My electric rate is about 0.12 / kwh. My gas rate is already up 28% this year, and will have doubled by winter.

    I have thought about radiant heat, but have some concerns. In the winter, my garage is around 40 degrees. I would like to keep it around 50 or so with the heat (to take the chill off) and be able to get it up around 60 degrees for short periods (warm enough to work out there, wash the car, etc.). Is radiant heat able to do this?

    Once again, due to the layout of my house and location of existing gas lines, it is cost prohibitive to run gas to my house. To illustrate, I am at $1200 alone to run the pipe. This does not include the additional electric run to my garage, the cost of the gas furnace, the hookup of the furnace, etc. I would strongly prefer gas, but it is too costly given the limitations I am facing.

    Thanks for the help. I would love some input on radiant heat.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    5,998

    Exclamation Alternate . Heat Pump

    Originally posted by atakin77
    My garage is 22 x 24 x 9, and not well insulated.

    However, in poking around the internet, I have not found much in the way of reviews of various electric heaters. Are there types or brands you would recommend? Are any more reliable than others?
    ALTERNATE (Gold plated ?):

    92 Foot perimeter x 9 = ~800 Sq. Ft. Walls
    Insulate walls with spray foam to ~R-10 for < $1,300.

    REF:
    http://www.icynene.com
    http://www.airtightinsulation.com

    Add 1-Ton Mini-Split Heat Pump and you are "good to go" Summer or Winter.

    Is $3,000 + project cost justified based on your intended use?

    Winter use only: Use 5kW electric heater.

    If you need any specific Heat Pump or project recommendations, you may contact me directly.
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,403
    I gotta reenforce whats been said (somewhat). Can you install more insulation in your garage (more in the attic, walls etc)? Won't cost you much and you can do it yourself most likely, and it'll save you money later.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold.calm
    Posts
    4,857
    Get a wood stove

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,996
    When radiant was mentioned. I think they meant electric ifrared radiant. Do a google search. They have some nice models that you can hang off the ceiling so it's out of the way. No forced air.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    66,808
    Remmember, radiant doesn't warm up fast from a 10 degree set back though, so you'll have to turn it up an hour or so before you want ot work in the garage when its closer to design temp.
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    8
    If I end up using radiant heat as many of you are recommending, will I need more than one unit to adequately heat the garage? The biggest ones I am finding are only around 3000 - 4000 watts, and designed to provide spot heat to an area something like 10 x 10. Should I put in two smaller ones, say around 2000 watts each? Should I put in two larger ones?

    I notice that a 4000 watt radiant heater draws significantly less amps - around 16 or so. Will two of these be more efficient in terms of electric usage than one 7500 watt forced air heater that draws 40 amps?

    Thanks for the help!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,996
    There are bigger ones. Radiant heaters hanging from the ceiling don't waste power trying to heat all the cold air space over your head.

    You may want to get several over the areas you'll be working.

    I would think the long tube style units would be best to hang overhead. You could put several down the middle of the garage. You might still need the 240V for the bigger units.

    Example
    http://www.electricpatiospaceheaters...ed-heaters.htm

  13. #13
    Originally posted by atakin77
    If I end up using radiant heat as many of you are recommending, will I need more than one unit to adequately heat the garage? The biggest ones I am finding are only around 3000 - 4000 watts, and designed to provide spot heat to an area something like 10 x 10. Should I put in two smaller ones, say around 2000 watts each? Should I put in two larger ones?

    I notice that a 4000 watt radiant heater draws significantly less amps - around 16 or so. Will two of these be more efficient in terms of electric usage than one 7500 watt forced air heater that draws 40 amps?

    Thanks for the help!

    Watts = volts x amps

    Two 4000 watt heaters should use the same total amperage as one 8,000 watt heater (assuming both operate on 240 volts). The fan in the forced air model will use some power, but it shouldn't be that much. Plus, the energy used by the fan motor will be dispersed as heat into the room anyway. Electric resistance heating is essentially 100% efficient.

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