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Thread: R22 Dry Units

  1. #1
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    May 2010
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    Connecticut
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    R22 Dry Units

    Was wondering everyone's thought on the r22 dry units. What i don't understand is the government want to phase out the use of R22 but at the same time HVAC contractors are selling these dry units, I totally disagree don't get me wrong I think that they serve there purpose in certain situations. But I would be nice to see more guys pushing a full 410a conversions. This is going on at lease in my area. Would like to know other experiences around the country.

  2. #2
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    Jun 2005
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    Winston-Salem NC
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    They sell a lot of them around here in my area.
    I could see using them, especially in places where running a new lineset and installing a new air handler would be difficult if not impossible. Thinking of some apartments I know of that you could barely fit one of the old 14"w Rheem AH/Coils into.

  3. #3
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    Mar 2011
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    Galveston Texas
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    530
    We sell quite a few of them. No problems with them. Alot of it is a money thing, the HO doesn't have enough to change out a whole system, and all that is bad is the condenser so it works out. Down here the condenser will go belly up long before the indoor coil and furnace even look bad.

  4. #4
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    Dec 2005
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    4,067
    I've seen and used many of them.

    They work fine.

    Give the people what they want.

  5. #5
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    Jun 2011
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    Puget Sound area, Wa
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    Do technicians explain that R22 is being phased out and that there will be a higher demand than is being made so the cost is going up? This will make a refrigerant repair more costly in the future.

  6. #6
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    Feb 2011
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    Atlantic City, New Jersey
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnbeck1000 View Post
    Do technicians explain that R22 is being phased out and that there will be a higher demand than is being made so the cost is going up? This will make a refrigerant repair more costly in the future.
    That's funny that you mention this because in our area its just the opposite. A jug of 410-A is more than 22 by about $100. We have not seen the price swing like we did when 12 was phased out. That is why the dry 22 units are coming around and are working very nice in our area as well.

  7. #7
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    Jun 2011
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    Puget Sound area, Wa
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    Quote Originally Posted by whoward View Post
    That's funny that you mention this because in our area its just the opposite. A jug of 410-A is more than 22 by about $100. We have not seen the price swing like we did when 12 was phased out. That is why the dry 22 units are coming around and are working very nice in our area as well.
    wow that's a huge price difference still. I was more or less meaning 5 years down the road. I was reading that the HVAC demand for R22 is going to be 1/3 higher than they can make and that company's are taking action now by recycling it. I mentioned in another thread that my company is getting money back to recycle it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Atlantic City, New Jersey
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    47
    yeah its being explained but we have had a role reversal here where 410-A pricing is sky rocketing and 22 is dropping. I believe this is because of the big push to 410-a drove the demand for it up. Thus realizing the dollars to be made they jacked our pricing up to make the money now.

  9. #9
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    Jan 2011
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    Ward, Arkansas, United States
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    In my area R410a jugs are still about 10 to 20 dollars higher than a jug of R22. Prices swing from distro to distro so I always call around.


    RE: Dry R22 Units

    I guess it's a numbers game. If manufactures think producing and selling these units is good for business they will continue to do it as long as the law allows. If by chance it dawns on someone that they are killing their whole house change out market...perhaps they will gear down on the production of R22 units.

    I sale these dry shipped units, actually we've sold several of them where compressor sales or whole-house change outs would have went last year but that's the way it goes.

    If I don't offer a dry-shipped unit price my competitors surely will and lets be honest when it comes right down to it most home owners care about cooling and don't get bogged down on the details of efficiency. When they are burning up all that matters is to get cooled down.

    I am of the opinion these dry shipped units are boosting sales of smaller contractors who don't have near the overhead of a company my size or larger. In previous years these contractors would have had little choice but to punt in-lieu of no time and lack of a true install crew and the home owner would call around to find a contractor that is more geared for change outs. That's not happening as often right now, or at least that is what I'm seeing so far this summer.
    "Gentlemen. You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!"-Dr. Strangelove (1964)

  10. #10
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    Jun 2011
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    Wake Forest, NC
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    352
    I have installed a few of the dry charged units. THey are a great fit in some circumstances. I tell you what though... the apartment industry will make it a profitable deal for the manufacturers all by them selves... I have sold a few to homeowners who purchaced forclosed homes that had the line sets hacked off and the condenser sat exposed to atm for 6 months. It was a great fit for them... We also had a tornado go through back in april and several neighborhoods either had condensers ripped off homes or debris went right through condensing coils. They were a great fit for those too... Bottom line is some customers dont have the money for a full change out and this gives them a good option.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    207
    Well Carrier is not to fond of the dry 22 units. There going after the EPA to ban them because they "violate the spirit of the law".

  12. #12
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    Jul 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carbon View Post
    Well Carrier is not to fond of the dry 22 units. There going after the EPA to ban them because they "violate the spirit of the law".
    Are you sure about that?

    I was just at a carrier supply house, they are offering dry 22 condensers. If you buy a condenser they are selling evap coils for 25 bucks to get rid of old stock.

    So I dont know where you got your info, I think its wrong.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    207
    Per the June 13th edition of the Air Conditioning, Heating, Refrigeration News. Front page headline " Carrier Asks EPA to Stop Dry R-22 Units". Goes on to say "The petition urges EPA to reconsider its current position and to issue a new rulemaking effective Janurary 1, 2012 said John Mandyck, Carrier vice president... In our opinion the rule as it currently exists is not in line with intent of the long- planned phase out of R-22, nor is it in-line with the Clean Air Act's mandate to curtail the use of ozone depleting substances" It's not April 1st so I would think the article is accurate.

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