Page 8 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 92 to 104 of 117
  1. #92
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    608
    If you read his OP you would see that he wasn't very interested in what the contractor wanted to do or how he would address issues,

    this guy sounds like he's a purchasing agent for some management company or something, Where you can get away with that kind of stuff dealing with contractors that need the work bad enough to put up with an idiots requests.

  2. #93
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Niantic, Illinois
    Posts
    545

    been there done that

    I've had guys like this go two ways. I always listen to them, and find out their schedules and concerns. I make my price based on solving their every problem.

    Once that is done they usualy run screaming from me over the price. Or decide they can live this and that and scale things down. Or sometimes I just wasted a bunch of time. It's always a crap shoot but the occasional time you close these customers their either a constant pita or the one of the best customers you ever had. It's hard to tell which will happen.

  3. #94
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,923
    I'd have given him a $25,000 bid and went home early. One should never be "afraid" to get the bid. If you bid high enough to cover any concerns, you never have to be afraid. With the OP, $25,000 would be my comfort zone.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  4. #95
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    San Luis Obispo County, CA
    Posts
    215
    Interesting thread, not for just what the OP said, but for the reactions.
    1 We want the customer to "compare apples to apples".
    Yet we get concerned when he's 'too specific."

    2 We say that installation is the most important part of the job.
    Yet we don't want to take the time during the estimate to do the calcs.

    3 We don't want to give our services away for free,
    Yet we don't give the customer the opportunity to pay for it. ( you are looking at roughly 9-12 g's, depending on equipment and needs, I can do a complete survey for XXX dollars and give you the best optomized solution for your job...)

    I have yet to see any "reputable" contractor in ANY of the service trades getting rich. Most we can hope for is to make a good living while we can, and hopefully have enough left over that we don't have to work until the day we die.
    We see the hacks getting by underselling us because they don't have insurance, don't take the time to do the job right, and don't pay their labor a decent wage.

    yet Joe Public has little information to go on to find somebody who is honest, knows what he is doing, and will charge him a fair price that leaves both the homeowner and the dealer happy.

    What is the answer? if I knew, I would package it up nice and pretty, and sell it, then I would become rich....

    One thing is certain though, the more the US vs THEM mentality prevails, both from consumer and dealer, the worse its going to get.

    I still believe that this is one area that the manufacturers could help with, by embracing a true industry wide trade organizaton, one that worked not to swell its own bank account, but one that truly tried to educate consumer and tech alike.

    Posts like this do show one thing though, and that is that the current business model isn't working very well, either for consumers or techs and dealers.

  5. #96
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,923
    Originally posted by dave_slo
    I still believe that this is one area that the manufacturers could help with, by embracing a true industry wide trade organizaton, one that worked not to swell its own bank account, but one that truly tried to educate consumer and tech alike.

    Posts like this do show one thing though, and that is that the current business model isn't working very well, either for consumers or techs and dealers.
    While I value what is stated in all of your post, why do you feel the burden of regulation should fall on manufacturers?

    Manufacturers offer all sorts of training, much of which is ignored by contractors. When manufacturers have in the past tried to set standards for contractors, the contractors rebelled, stating that the manufacturers were trying to control the contractors.

    What you are suggesting would require manufacturers to have complete control over the contractors that sell and install their equipment. This has been tried and failed.

    But...if contractors utilize the current lobbiests that they already have at their disposal, this sort of regulatory action could take place. By forcing government regulations on the sale and installation of HVAC equipment, contractors and manufacturers alike would be more in control of the product of our industry.

    This was truly diminished in the actuality of CFC certification which at the last minute took away the industry tool of requiring any equipment containing CFC refrigerant to be purchased only by those holding CFC certificates.

    With the safety factors of the equipment that the HVAC industry deals with, it really should not be that difficult to push through regulations on how this product is sold and installed. This cannot be done by manufacturers. It has been tried and the the contractors have rebelled violently against it.

    The future of our industry is up to all of us, but the regulatory actions must come from the contractors and their lobbiests.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  6. #97
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    69
    Telling the contractor about the permit informed them you knew something and probably scared some of them. The bigger companies probably felt they were wasting their time because you probably would go with the cheapest bid. the low ballers probably felt it was too big of a job for them. I would have everything written down I wanted and mailed it to them and asked them to bid on it. When I had my system put in several years ago the first bid the salemans sized the AC and furnace. When I questioned the size of the service for the ac he told me the installers would put in what is needed. And I commented who is deciding what I need, you or the installers. The second gentleman answered all of my questions, turned out he was a service manager for the company. The third bid was too busy to come after I waited for him twice. I went with the second bid. I think 15 is a bit excessive. The best time to get bids is in the off season so to speak.

  7. #98
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,923
    I'm still trying to figure out where in PA they require permits. There is no HVAC licensing in PA.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  8. #99
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    608
    Robo,
    it is not good practice to throw out high estimates to chase off a pITA customer, the contractors did the right thing by just not replying to him at all. Once he has your high estimate everyone he knows will see it and you will get tagged as expensive, remember bad news travels fast and good news has to be pushed.

  9. #100
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Gaylord, Michigan
    Posts
    729
    Though not replying can be considered bad business practice as well. Could just as easily tarnish your reputation in that way too.

  10. #101
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    608
    Not replying doesn't have a paper trail

  11. #102
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,923
    well, I have to disagree with tossing out a high bid is going to bite anyone in the butt later on. It's not like there is a union of organized HO's comparing bids. Besides, the once in a while that the high bid is the only bid or everyone else did the same can pay off very well.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  12. #103
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    608
    In the OP's fictional scenario , I would not give hi a bid because if I decide not to deal with him I still would not want to deal with him for a little bit more money because he has already figured what he thinks is a justified price and he wil lmake you earn your money no matter what you charge, I guess wht I am saying is that you can not charge him enough.

  13. #104
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    griffin,ga
    Posts
    12
    i personally would have went to the appointment and gave him a fair bid, but probably would have turned down the job at this time of year and asked him if he would be interested in waiting until we were a bit slower

Page 8 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image