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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,193

    Door Seal Installation/cutting

    I have a door seal on a refrigerator that I need to fix. I have a piece of material to do the repair with. I am going to try to fix it before I spend $70 for a complete new one already assembled in one piece.

    I am probably going to cut a 45 degree angle on it whether in the corner or in the middle of the seal assembly to do the piecing unless there is a better method. What I am really wondering is what should I use to join the pieces together to bond them into one piece? Thanks
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    123
    good luck!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    307
    RTV Silicone
    Extended dehydration is the key

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    226
    Alot easier on a cool er than a freezer, But make sure its dry and use the RTV silicone

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Monmouth Junction-NJ-USA
    Posts
    6,029
    There is a gasket notcher just for that purpose. Believe me you are much better off having the gasket made. United refrigeration can get them for you. I haven't cut my own gaskets for over 20 years and we install about 80 a year.
    If you really know how it works, you have an execellent chance of fixin' er up!

    Tomorrow is promised to no one...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4,381
    I agree with ordering it ... I use FMP who are reasonably priced & have them to me next day 99% of the time .... a attempted to piece together a gasket once .. that particular product which sucked quickly ended up in the garbage

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,862
    Quote Originally Posted by rayr View Post
    There is a gasket notcher just for that purpose. Believe me you are much better off having the gasket made. United refrigeration can get them for you. I haven't cut my own gaskets for over 20 years and we install about 80 a year.
    X2

    Unless it is the gasket material that comes on a roll, I'm not fooling with it.

    That stuff, I drag out the pneumatic stapler, tack it in place, cut with snips and finish by screwing the plates back in place

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,460
    If you want to fabricate vinyl gaskets from roll stock, you really need a gasket machine which uses induction heating to fuse the pieces together...but that's big bucks.

    3M makes a vinyl adhesive which does work fairly well (I got mine from RHS). I've tried it and found you need to make a jig to hold the pieces while they set overnight. I tries using wood scraps screwed to a sheet of plywood, but it was rather time consuming. I also tried using clamps, which were a bit easier, but still a PITA.

    When all is said and done, unless you have the right tools and enough volume to justify those tools, it's much more profitable to just order the dang things.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Winston-Salem NC
    Posts
    1,133
    Ditto on ordering the right gasket premade.
    Unless it is your unit.
    The extra cost involved is the customer's, not yours.
    And if the one you make doesn't seal perfectly, then you are going to have issues, that you will have to warranty, which will cost you money.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,193
    I should have stated it is mine. It is on a side by side refrigerator. The bottom gasket on the cooler side tore all the way across. My dad gave me a piece of gasket material he has from who knows where, but it looks new.

    I have been tweaking on this unit a bit, and I think if I can get this seal fixed it will cut down on the run time a bit. This thing is 16 years old, so I don't want to put a lot into it. Appliance store wnats about $70 for a new one, and I can get one on ebay for $53. I thought I was going to have to change the compressor due to what turned out to be a restriction causing a high head pressure which was causing a clanking noise on shutdown, so at that point I was looking at about $300 for materials including the gasket, and started looking for a new refrigerator. Decided to dig into it Friday night and got the compressor running good now with factory speced charge and all of that. Held 500 microns vac at 590 microns, so no leaks evidently. Worth a gasket probably, but i do hvac work for a living and you know how that goes.
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Winston-Salem NC
    Posts
    1,133
    Is that like the shoemaker's kids going barefoot and the tailor's kids wearing rags?
    Or the HVAC tech who still ain't gotta around to putting a filter in?
    (In my defense, it is a Rheem coil, and in a closet with easy access, cleaning it takes 15 minutes top)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,193
    Quote Originally Posted by stonewallred View Post
    Is that like the shoemaker's kids going barefoot and the tailor's kids wearing rags?
    Or the HVAC tech who still ain't gotta around to putting a filter in?
    (In my defense, it is a Rheem coil, and in a closet with easy access, cleaning it takes 15 minutes top)
    Just trying to fix instead of replace, and maybe learn something that may get me out of a bind sometime. Plus I am tight with my money.
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Winston-Salem NC
    Posts
    1,133
    Quote Originally Posted by nchvac View Post
    Just trying to fix instead of replace, and maybe learn something that may get me out of a bind sometime. Plus I am tight with my money.
    No problems with that. Money seems to always be one of those hard to come by but easy to go thingees.

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