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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Lower mainland bc.
    Posts
    105

    Can geothermal heat be stored in the earth?

    This is a interesting question I think, some one asked once but lost the thread. Can radiant heat from heat panels on the roof be stored underground, then retrieved to heat for example the house, or hot water?

    Thanks a bunch!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,603
    Trane was experimenting with something similiar in the mid 1970s. They were heating a slury that was similiar to concrete, that would never set. I believe the stuff also had a lot of salt in it. The problem was it had to be mixed to distribute the heat evenly, that used almost or more energy than was captured. Don't think they ever found something that had a large BTU storage ability, in a compact size, that didn't have to be mixed.

    Horizontal Ground Source heat pumps loops do that to some extent.

  3. #3
    I'm agree with your thoughts.

  4. #4
    Madhat
    Quote Originally Posted by GermainPilon View Post
    I'm agree with your thoughts.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    NORTHERN
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    991
    Quote Originally Posted by GermainPilon View Post
    Madhat
    Since every ground , is the "condition" , no 2 loops are identical in storage, nor depleting exchange or admission of heat energy, I have reason to believe.

    Found that horizontal boring works fine in workable conditions, and seems 10-12% more footage at depths under 10ft boring , is better than vertical (even 15% more boring, like a dry , non-rock, vertical borehole may require).

    In situ testing I did in 1997 showed a 30% variation from just locations in Cleveland 5 miles away from each. one test was over in 1/2 day static water was 44ft from grade ; and the other static water at 125 ft , used for a library, had a 19th hole installed, because 12 hours into the testing, it was still gaining at 30% warmer than that first one... More footage on the spot (at my and the drillers expense) to cover the engineering for 'hoping' to not have to use antifreeze at all. It worked. above 38 entering, but jamming over 3gpm per "size-ton" close to 4gpm per compressor-label-ton.
    ... however, much work still needs to be done.
    CLOSED LOOP newer ratings are listed, but in numerical EER's Closed- is posted below OPEN LOOP EER's:

    http://www.energystar.gov/productfin...r=0&lastpage=1

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    NORTHERN
    Posts
    991
    Quote Originally Posted by madhat View Post
    Trane was experimenting with something similiar in the mid 1970s. They were heating a slury that was similiar to concrete, that would never set. I believe the stuff also had a lot of salt in it.
    Horizontal Ground Source heat pumps loops do that to some extent.
    The Swede's in the 70's posted reports with graphical cross section views of cisterns heated for storage.
    In 1980 an article had a view of a cross section of the DRY earth - stored heat- shown as a cardioid shape about a cistern that was 2" insulated at the top, and top was 5ft deep . Can't rem the soil conditions, nor ground temp.
    ... however, much work still needs to be done.
    CLOSED LOOP newer ratings are listed, but in numerical EER's Closed- is posted below OPEN LOOP EER's:

    http://www.energystar.gov/productfin...r=0&lastpage=1

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Virginia Beach VA
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by lortech View Post
    Can radiant heat from heat panels on the roof be stored underground, then retrieved to heat for example the house, or hot water?
    You could store some heat in the ground but the losses will be very high. Better to store the heat in water in a well insulated tank. If it needs to be underground, it is possible to have below grade insulated hot water storage. Lots of people heat their home with solar radiant (hydronic) systems, do you have an unusual situation?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    ky
    Posts
    181
    Drake's Landing Canada

    http://www.dlsc.ca/borehole.htm


    a solar thermal energy earth storage community

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Lower mainland bc.
    Posts
    105

    All I can say is WOW

    Did you guys read the last paragraph of this document??

    http://www.dlsc.ca/borehole.htm

    I know, if a medium takes a long time to heat to its maximum heat absobtion potential, it can also take a long time to give off heat. But this last paragraph is interesting. Takes three years to reach maximum heat absorption yet, will give off enough energy after the third year, to heat a house for a entire winter.

    I do not know what is the take on this, but I bet physics minded people would like to know.

    I wonder what the cost would be to put something like this in?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    ky
    Posts
    181
    the system is actually has two storage parts. one using Tank filled with glycol mix. another the bore hole fields.

    The solar collector has enough capacity to heat up the house and the first storage tanks. but since the bore hole field is vast it act just like giant heat sink. for the first 3 years
    the bore hole field capacity is probably in the order of 100x of the first storage tanks

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Eastern Shore, MD
    Posts
    798
    it alreadys happens...via the sun.

    if you want more heat transfer, you dont need more heat, you need something that transfers heat better than high density polyethylene.... see www.advgeo.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,603
    I wonder what they do where the ground is acidity, like here in Maryland where it can eat up a "L" pipe in five years. Also how do they protect the system from lightening, and transcents, we've had holes blown in under ground copper pipe at work!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Float'N Vally, MS
    Posts
    1,841
    Quote Originally Posted by madhat View Post
    I wonder what they do where the ground is acidity, like here in Maryland where it can eat up a "L" pipe in five years. Also how do they protect the system from lightening, and transcents, we've had holes blown in under ground copper pipe at work!
    1) Some type of cathode protection
    2) You can't fight mother nature....
    Life is too short, Behappy!
    TFMM

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