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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Winston-Salem NC
    Posts
    1,133
    Quote Originally Posted by roadtrip View Post
    what are the everyday physical works that involved in this field?
    oh and someone earlier mentioned working 15hrs in the heat/cold for 4 straight day, holyy coww!! that is some cruesome stuff, does that happen often?
    Me and my partner carried ~300' of spirial pipe, fittings, a 5T HP, a 126K BTU 90% gas furnace, and the cased coil for the HP up three flights of square spiral stairs yesterday, and the stairs were about 4" wider than the HP and steep. We still have to go up a set of square spiral stars with the HP to the roof, and they are only 2" wider than the unit.

    Other days I might run 5 or 6 calls and never pick up anything heavier than my meter, six way and a pair of sidecutters, along with a capacitor or contact.

    You work when you work, in the environment the job is at. And most places, if it is a repair, your work until it is fixed if you have the stuff at hand to do it.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    SouthEast NC ICW & Piedmont Foothills
    Posts
    7,635
    Quote Originally Posted by trouble time View Post
    I agree with the first 3, but....
    If you are working a lot you will be.....
    4-cold in the winter & warm in the summer.......
    why'd you go and do that
    It`s better to be silent and thought the fool; than speak and remove all doubt.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Glenrothes, Scotland
    Posts
    48
    Reading the above posts, I am happy to see that heating guys across the globe have broadly similar experiences... warm in the winter! Ha! Seriously, the major positive for me is that I could never envisage being bored in my job. I am in a different place every day, working on everything from small domestic boilers of about 18kW (61k Btus to you fellas!) up to commercial combined heat and power units of about 2.8mW heat input rating. (about 9.5m Btus!) We have ground source heat pumps, solar thermal systems and ancient 19th century systems which need tlc. The work can be physically demanding, but you can specialise in niches which dont need you to carry anything heavier than a tool box. If you really want it easy, become a controls guy. Only kidding!

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
    Posts
    2,420
    Quote Originally Posted by Boabcelt View Post
    Reading the above posts, I am happy to see that heating guys across the globe have broadly similar experiences... warm in the winter! Ha! Seriously, the major positive for me is that I could never envisage being bored in my job. I am in a different place every day, working on everything from small domestic boilers of about 18kW (61k Btus to you fellas!) up to commercial combined heat and power units of about 2.8mW heat input rating. (about 9.5m Btus!) We have ground source heat pumps, solar thermal systems and ancient 19th century systems which need tlc. The work can be physically demanding, but you can specialise in niches which dont need you to carry anything heavier than a tool box. If you really want it easy, become a controls guy. Only kidding!
    Greetings Scotsman!

    I agree entirely. As I mentioned in an earlier post, If you get bored, it means you aren't paying attention! While I'm a evil American to the core, I haven't forgotten my roots. Clan Menzies, of Aberfeldy! Vil God I Zal. I always joke that there's a castle with my name on it waiting for me, It's just that I have to wait for everybody else to die first!

    HVAC is not for the weak of mind or for those that lack courage. When you're the only one there to stave off disaster there's only one thing to do: stay calm and focus on the work at hand.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


  5. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Glenrothes, Scotland
    Posts
    48
    My family name is Dingwall, a sept of the clan Munro. Dread God. Aberfeldy is a bonnie place. It's about an hours drive away from me!

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    114
    Stay away from those 1Hour thing and that sevice thing!
    Bob O. 84,Pa.

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Northeast Missouri
    Posts
    61
    This is a 24/7/365 field. Nights, weekends, holidays, we have to do em all. Some techs call this a job, I call it my career. The biggest disadvantage I have found through my years is I always know what time I am leaving for work, but never what time I am getting off work. Luckily my wife is very understanding to the hours of my work, if you have a lady or kids that are not this can be a tough field for you.

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    11,874

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    SouthEast NC ICW & Piedmont Foothills
    Posts
    7,635
    It`s better to be silent and thought the fool; than speak and remove all doubt.

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,042
    this field will drive you to drink for sure. or if you already are, more often.
    Parts Changer Extraordinaire
    ------------------------------------------------------
    Have tools and gauges, will travel.

    RIDGID|YELLOW JACKET|UEI|TESTO|STANLEY|CPS|VETO| KLEIN|MILWAUKEE|MASTERCRAFT|

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Palm Beach,Fl.
    Posts
    990
    Its more of a career than a job. Takes dedication and flexibility, but for anyone with a passion for quality, honest work, you will always be in demand somewhere. And the money will follow.

    This trade requires you to be a plumber, electrician, carpenter, roofer or any combination of those at times, and you still better know a great deal about refrigeration.

    Usually, you're the savior, a white knight with a pair of gauges. Sometimes not so much.

    Always try to make the customer feel like they're getting their moneys worth.

    Its an art when done properly and there's a certain pride in leaving a new installation, or even repairs, that your work will be in place for decades in some cases. You get to put your own personal signature on everything you touch.

    You WILL say horrendous things to inanimate machines on the daily.

    You'll bleed fairly regularly, especially if you're in a rush.

    When its hot out, you're even hotter, and when its cold, you're damn near freezing.

    Your diet will probably go to hell. Unless you're good about packing healthy lunches and snacks every day.
    Quote Originally Posted by k-fridge View Post
    The laws of physics know no brand names.

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    14
    It's definitely not for everyone.

    Some days are better than others, but I couldn't see myself working any other kind of job.

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    70
    You will never stop learning
    Meet the best peeps and learn how to fix anything

    The job will challenge everyday in every way

    You will never be out of a Job and when the boss tells you that your lucky to have a job. You can say sorry but your lucky to have me

    Try to find an old timer HVAC Tech and listen and learn.
    HVAC Tech of 33 years in the HVACR and Controls Industry

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