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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    4

    Hmm

    Hi All:

    I would like to use 1" type M copper tubing to make a fireplace insert that fits over my cast iron fireplace grate. I will use a small fan to force room temp air through the tubing to be heated and back into the room to heat the room. The system would be sealed against CO. The melting point of copper is well above what should be experienced in the firebox. I'll have an alloy cuff between the pipe and the fan to cut heat transfer so the fan won't get too hot from the copper pipe.

    Before I do this, I want to make sure I'm not missing something obvious (or subtle).

    thanks, T

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,927
    Originally posted by tendon
    Hi All:

    The melting point of copper is well above what should be experienced in the firebox. Before I do this, I want to make sure I'm not missing something obvious (or subtle).

    thanks, T
    Of course you know better than I what your set-up looks like,but a wood stove can get hot enough to melt copper.
    Sometimes there are compounding complexities of multiple variables that are not intuitively obvious

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    4
    Hi Jacob: Thanks for your reply. Well, I was working with "typical" temps of 900-1200 F for wood within a masonry firebox. Hopefully that's correct. Copper melts at 1984 F.

    Thanks, T

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,927
    okay
    will you braize your copper pieces together instead of soft solder?
    okay.
    i tried something like this once with a box stove years ago and burnt my copper. nothing left but ashes.
    good luck.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    568
    ABSOLUTELY NO.NO NO NO

    The copper will oxidize to pinholes in a few weeks of fires.

    A worst case story. My own house has a waterwall fireplace with stainless steel pipes and steel doors, then piping goes to old car AC condensor coils in ducting. Built this 35 years ago when a dumb kid (boss was smart, he at least told me to do ss in the FP), had put brazed (5%silphos)copper after the stainless but before the HE. Worked great for about 5 years. Kids grew up enough to where we both worked and they usually started a fire (heated with wood then, they 50 cent reward for starting fire, big bucks) when they came home from high school, one day they threw all kindling in, got hot enough superheat steam it actually melted the braze!!!

    If you are only putting air thru the copper, a prediction is that it will last about 2 months.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    1,383
    I'd imagine that your fire insurance company will decline to foot the bill for the house fire you may start with this apparatus.

    Of course, you can call your insurance company and notify them of your plans. If you do that, I expect they will cancel your coverage ASAP.

    This is FIRE. In your HOUSE. There are lots of ways you can screw things up and kill someone or burn your house down.



    Seattle Pioneer

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    4
    Junkhound:

    "The copper will oxidize to pinholes in a few weeks of fires."

    OK, now that's a convincing point! Thanks.

    I'll look into commercial inserts. Any suggestions?

    Thanks, T

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