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Thread: Leak check

  1. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Ontario, Canada
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    831
    Quote Originally Posted by Saturated Suter View Post
    The original question is: "when doing this which access port should be used to charge this into the system and should the same access port be used to check the pressure?"

    That sounds like a DIY question to me.

    One says tomato while the other says Tomδto.

    Can't we all get along?

    To this site and our differences!
    Maybe not DYI. I asked some pretty out there questions on here when I was a trade school noob.

    There are different kinds of leaks. In Canada, "hot shots" are not allowed and if caught doing one you can be fined or imprisoned as it's a violation of the laws made by Environment Canada. We have to use dry nitrogen.

    One leak is pressure dependant. For example it only shows up after a certain pressure.

    If you are in school read up in your books. As the guys have said different situations require different methods.
    Get money, get paid.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Elmwood Park
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    23
    Thanks to all that responded. With different systems and different situations there of course are different tests that need to be performed to find leaks. The discussion that stemed from the question and the ways you all interpreted it was helpful indeed and will allow me to ask more precise questions in the future and pay it forward to new techs joining the field.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Payette, Idaho
    Posts
    117
    [QUOTE=Jack8080;10485392]Well I never said i'm trying this on my own. I'm actually attending school for hvac right now. My current professor is not being very helpful .....


    Is the school you are attending free? If you are paying for the education, then I would damn well make sure you're getting your money's worth. You are the customer/employer. You are not paying for the privilege to just sit in his class. You are paying for the opportunity to learn. Ask questions until you understand the answers. School is the time to ask any and all questions.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Elmwood Park
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    23
    @baloo I'm not on this site to get life advice. I got some good answers from a few of the guys so if you have nothing important to add that relates to the topic then refrain and don't waste peoples time.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    sunnny south west florida
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    34
    our last resorts to find leaks are what is commonly known as an isolation test....each separate refrigerant containing component is cut from the loop, sealed, and charged with strait dry nitrogen, valve stems will have to be added to any component that doesn't already have them. charge them all up , and wait to see which one has lost pressure. there is a difference between testing for leak and then finding them for repair, and i believe you did say "finding leaks". the last thing you want is to sell new equipment to a customer with a leak in the line set. A few moths later you will return to add gas and you will have one pissed off home owner. the proses is very involved and i never look forward to doing it, this should always be done by some one with ears of experience in repairs.
    hang in there.....the school i went to was similar and i eventually quit. the first year was spent on how to use tools, like a hammer, or a power drill.. keep in mind this was a night school and all of us were working in the field and im pretty sure we all new how to use a drill, but then again i have met some special people who shouldn't be allowed to use a broom. the internet is going to provide some wonderful opportunitys for the next generation of technicians and you should do as suggested, and get your post count up so you can fully take advantage of the site to accomplish your educational goals.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Elmwood Park
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    23
    Thanks icoolfla, yeah i've been attending a local community college for hvac for the last 2 years. However, because of work and other priorities it's only been 1-2 classes at a time. Now they're canceling the program altogether b/c of lack of funding masked by lack of interest. So my last professor would rather complain about losing his job or not show up for class. The dean and other counselors I went to complain to wouldn't be of much help. I didn't want to push the subject to far as it might cost me an easy A. So next semester should be my last but that will depend on the new college I have to go to.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    sunnny south west florida
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    34
    professor not showing up for class....hehehe....yah i remember that. keep in mind depending what is required in your state to get a contractors license you may not need the school. florida wants 4 years as a mechanic or supervisor and budy those 4 years fly buy in the hot sun. this is equivalent in the stats mind to vocational school, and better in my opinion. the trick is to find an employer willing to give you a chance and jumping at the opportunity of being thrown to the wolves. i wish i would have been using a resource like this a decade ago as i allso know that some times older coworkers can be reluctant to show you things as they may view you as a threat to there job. as long as you stay interested in learning you will breeze buy the rest of them and take advantage of any one willing to teach you in the field as that is wear you will learn the fastest.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wake Forest, NC
    Posts
    352
    Sounds like a pretty slack school to me.. A waste of money, and not much knoweledge gained... Can you say R-E-F-U-N-D...

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    sunnny south west florida
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    yah mine was paid for by the employer, and it was pretty ghetto. i stayed for a year in a half. during the orientation at the beginning of year 2 the speaker siad " this is a state funded program we teach the bear minimum". it wasnt long after that that i approached my employer and expressed that i did not have the time to waste on this, 3 hours a nite , 2 nites a weak, all year round, for 4 years. i was a young parent and i told my boss that if i was going to go to school for 4 years i better come out with a bachelors degree. I figured i already managed to get a job in the field so in my opinion i already knew the bare minimum. my employer laughed and told me not to sweat it.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Payette, Idaho
    Posts
    117
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack8080 View Post
    @baloo I'm not on this site to get life advice. I got some good answers from a few of the guys so if you have nothing important to add that relates to the topic then refrain and don't waste peoples time.
    Excuse me for caring.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    16
    The nitrogen alone is for making sure you do not have any leaks before final vacuuming and start up. if you have a system that is low on charge and you need to find a leak i use a good electronic leak detector. I used to use an h-10 now i am using a JB Prowler and have good success with it. once you find the area use soap bubbles to pinpoint it. if you can't find the leak use the UV dye kit and inject into system. go back after a week or so and using the uv light you should be able to find it.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    S.C.
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    1,390
    Quote Originally Posted by crazeehorse View Post
    What we're talking about, is referring to the original question about leak testing by using nitrogen for pressure testing to find a leak. If you would like to discuss other methods, start another thread & I will be glad discuss these methods with you.
    Go for it Crazeehorse... We have One Guest Asking for DIY help and another Guest that is willing (to break the Rules too).

    Yes, I read that Jack is in the Trade but he needs to get his Post Count Up (as you do) and Apply for a Pro Membership.

    From a What The Heck standpoint, if the system has refrigerant in it now if you are a Tech, why not leak check it (instead of reclaiming the charge and pumping it up with Nitrogen)?

    And before I posted another "New Guest" has decided to jump in. (pricedrightkc)

    Quote Originally Posted by Baloo2327 View Post
    Excuse me for caring.
    What Rules?
    Yes, I know I Shouldn't But I Just Can't Help Myself...

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    sunnny south west florida
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    34
    From a What The Heck standpoint, if the system has refrigerant in it now if you are a Tech, why not leak check it (instead of reclaiming the charge and pumping it up with Nitrogen)?

    we only do this when all else has failed. we isolate the coils and lines and go from there. this is a costly way to do it and is only done on systems that are under warranty, or there is some other reason to pay a guy to do all that crap, usually leads to a new line set , and occasionally we find some tiney leak in a coil that for some reason wasn't picked up by the h-10 or couldn't be seen by the naked eye using die. other than that i agree, nitrogen is mainly used for start ups and line testing, "underground".

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