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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,414
    Well I'm in the early stages of the basement remodel in my house. By early stages, it's about 99.9% thinking/dreaming of what to do lol.

    Anyway, where the mechanical room is likely to be, there won't be a floor drain (unless I get excited and dig a trench, install a floor drain, bah, ain't happening). I know how to ditch the condensate from the A/C, but what's a good thing to do with that pop off valve? I know I've been in rooms w/o floor drains before, but I guess I've never paid any attention to what they did. It won't move very far from where it's at, but right now it's just going to dump on the floor if it ever goes off, not exactly how I'd like to cristen my new remodel.

    I was thinking of lifting it up a few inches, putting a pan under it (seen them sold at the wearhouse's), then pipe that into the condensate? Seems like a somewhat safe plan. I guess if it decided to let all 80 gallons out I'm screwed, but if it only dumps a few out, the pump/pan should contain it fairly well.

    Anywho, suggestions, or advice on what to?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Slacking off right now
    Posts
    7,546
    whats code for your'e area gotta follow that if you want insurance to cover any water damage if tank pops
    www.vetopropac.com - The best tool bags on the market - The offical tool bag of choice by techs everywhere

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    When they activate, they are at anywhere from street pressure on up to 150 psi.

    You're gonna dump a LOT. And it will continue to dump until the condition that caused it to dump is remediated.

    Make the pan BIG and the pump BIG, and you might be on to something.

    Just had mine go last week due to a failed upper stat. Not at all pretty.

  4. #4
    How close is it to a floor drain, outdoor accetable area, if the pipe is sized and placed right it is allowed to be piped putside. ( in my area, check your codes)

    Forget about a condensate pump, it will cost a lot of money to get one sized for that many BTU's and it doesn't help you a lot if it blows steam. I would be more concerned of what to do when the tank fails in the normal manner , of popping a hole in the flue chase and l;eaking onto the floor, this is a more likely scenario. So I guess I would say, a pan under the whole tank, with a condensate pump, and pipe the relief to the outdoors if it is possible.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,703
    over flow pipe will have pressure if it ever goes, i would run oversized pipe up and out sidewall. put pan under tank with water alarm for when it leaks.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Bennington, Vermont U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,864
    Originally posted by t527ed
    over flow pipe will have pressure if it ever goes, i would run oversized pipe up and out sidewall. put pan under tank with water alarm for when it leaks.
    Not Good. The pop off valve is really called a pressure/temperature relief valve or P/T valve.This mean either high pressure or high temperature will allow this to trip. According to the BOCA National Plumbers code. pipe from the relief valve must terminate 12" above the floor. Pipe must be full size and not reduced.

    If you go up and out there is a chance that rust and sediment could settle on the set and not "pop" when it is supposed to.

    Just pipe it to the 1 foot above the floor. Do your preventive maintenace and it will never Pop anyways. Change the valve every 5 years.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Bennington, Vermont U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,864
    Besides what is the big deal. Rent an electric jack hammer.
    Get a 5gal plastic bucket. Punch some holes in it. Fill it with rock and bury it in the ground. Mortar around the top to make it pretty.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157
    when that thing goes off at 150 lbs ---it is going to blast you , that room and everything else in it with scalding water that you wont be able to shut off.

    run it outside --put a trap in the line if you are concerned with the valve rusting

    terminate that pipe 1 foot above the floor and you will have all hell break loose. Out here in Cali you must run it outside or into a drain

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,285

    Against code to run it outside...everywhere

    It must end in a visible location. It also must not freeze, and turn a drippy valve into a bomb.

    Try a WAGS valve...

    http://www.wagsvalve.com/how.html

    Noel

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Cincinnati
    Posts
    7,977
    Just plug the damn thing.




    What's the worst that could happen.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,285

    Free movie of plugged water heater explosions

    http://www.wattsreg.com/default.htm?...g/orderdvd.htm


    WELL worth watching!!!!!

    Pictures and story of an ELECTRIC water heater explosion from a plugged relief valve, in a newspaper, here...

    http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/33094_boom28.shtml

    Noel

    [Edited by Noel Murdough on 09-23-2005 at 06:12 PM]

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,942

    Talking

    pipe it down to 3'above the floor and put a 5 gallon bucket under it,blow it off every....spring and....fall and always empty the bucket.if you see it dripping between blow off change it out...flush your heater tank yearly also!
    "when in doubt...jump it out" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1qEZHhJubY

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,414
    Should have mentioned it's an electric, all plastic version. So the only way it "should" leak is this pop off valve.

    As the layout is now, it's only going to be 5' or so from a floor drain. But.... that floor drain will likely turn into a tub or toilet drain if things work out properly. I'm sure I could dig up some floor, fine where the sewer runs under the floor and tap into that, making a new floor drain. But if I'm not mistaken, that sounds like a whole lot of work. Might be worth it if I can't find anything else though.

    I could move the mechanical room over to another location where there is a floor drain, but that would really screw up any decent layout of the basement.

    Next week hopefully I'll be around a plumber or 2 and see what they do or have seen in this area.

    [Edited by amickracing on 09-23-2005 at 09:52 PM]

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