Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 14

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Posts
    6

    Question

    I've owned a place for about a year now and was just having some work done on my heat pump.

    I've got a contractor, I really like and trust, though I don't have much history with him. I'd like to run what he's told me past some proffesionals, not so much to get a second opinion as to get a supplement to what he's told me.

    Initially he replaced the compressor in the heat exchanger and repaired a leak in the return piping to the compressor.

    In doing so he noticed the pressures on the return line were much higher than they should have been. Looking for the source of this problem, he's found two issues.

    First, the heat exchanger is too large for the furnace. The heat pump is a Trane HP26-036-7P and the furnace is a CB29M-41-1P which don't match up according to ARI tables in Trane's engineering handbooks.

    The other problem is that he doesn't think the installer filled the copper lines with an inert gas when soldering them together and the interior of the pipe is flaking off and plugging up the expansion valve.

    He'll be replacing the expansion valve this week and will try to clean out that line.

    My question is how poorly will the mis-sized units function together? He says it will do better in cooling than heating? Are we talking 80% efficient or 40% efficient?

    Also has anyone else had similar problems with copper lines not being installed right and then plugging up the expansion valve?

    Thanks,

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    First, by heat exchanger is he refering to the indoor coil? Second, yes weld crap can get to the metering device if nitro wasn't used during brazing. Have him put a bi-flow filter drier about 6 inches from the expansion valve. Don't forget there is another orifice out by the condenser for the heat cycle. Systems should be matched, and you have to be an engineer with all the figures to tell you exactly how much effiency it will lose.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Posts
    6

    Smile

    Smokin68,

    Thanks. The heat exchanger is an outdoor heat pump. I probably mis-spoke myself.

    the technician said he cleaned out the liquid line returning to the heat pump so not to worry about that side. Would that be the orifice you were talking about for the heating cycle?

    I am an Engineer myself but a Civil one. I suppose that makes me too curious for my own good. All this fascinates me but it just makes the wife either too hot or too cold!

    Thanks again,

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    yes, but I'd still use a new bi flow filter drier up by the metering device. JMO
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,051
    If by return line you were talking about the big line.
    in the cooling mode, if dirt was plugging up the txv, the pressure in that line would be low.

    Perhaps I'm misunderstanding you.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Posts
    6
    My understanding is the line from the furnace to the heat pump was cleanned out. That was the line with the leak in it. It was also the line that registared too high of pressure.

    The line that is being fixed this next week is the line from the heat pump to the furnace.

    I'm thinking the unit would be running in heating mode. Though I'm positive under which operating mode he got the high pressures.

    Could the higher than expected pressures come from the mis-matched unit sizes?

    Appreciating all your inputs,

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,051
    Yes, that is a possibility.

    The liquid line, is the return line in heat mode.
    The big line(vapor) is the return line in cooling mode.

    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    In a heatpump, the liquid line is the liquid line(sm copper line) in both heating and cooling, just flowing refrigerant in different directions. The suction line(big copper line) is the suction line in cooling mode, and the hot gas line in heating mode. I repeat, he has to clean out both metering devices and install the new filter drier.As far as cleaning one line at a time, that won't cut it because as soon as you start it up you have the remaining crap distributed through the entire system unless the drier catches it.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    PA/DE area
    Posts
    1,535
    They look like LENNOX model numbers to me????
    It's NOT the BRAND,it's the company that installs it!!!!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Posts
    6
    Yes, they are Lennox numbers.

    My appologies for mis-lableing them.

    -Jason

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,743
    2.5 ton air handler, 3 ton heat pump. match not listed by lennox.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Posts
    6

    Question Match not listed by Lennox


    Thanks for looking up that they are not a match. I was able to get some stuff on line that confirmed that myself.

    My question is what does that mean? Specifically why are they not a match? Too little surface area on the coils inside the furnace? Too big of a fan?

    And then will it matter? Am I just spending a little more money than I could be due to wasted efficiency? Will I burn out compressors too quickly? Will it not be able to produce heat in the winter?

    And finally is there anything that can be done short of replacing the furnace to make them work better together?

    Thanks,
    Jason

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Posts
    6

    An update

    Just wanted to pass on an update to everybody here. Sorry it's been a little while.

    When the contractor was out replacing the expansion valve at the furnace he noticed that I had the "Green slime" and that the whole system would have to be replaced.

    Luckily, my wife and I were at a position to be able to have the additional work done at now. Which they completed just last week, including replacing the furnace with a unit sized for the heat exchanger.

    We also had them replace the thermostat while they were doing the work.

    Since then the house has been amazingly better. It holds a steady temperature and the furnace isn't running all the time.

    As an aside, I've heard some other people say that they had bad experiances with the company whose name was on the original unit. From what I can tell, I'm fairly certain they are out of buisness by now.

    Thanks again for the help from this board.
    -Jason

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event