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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Orange County, in a Galaxy far far away...
    Posts
    277
    To Teck323 & MarkusSD

    I'm based out of Orange County, CA and I think the certification the companies are looking for are your EPA license type 1 & 2 at a minimum and most expect universal (type 1,2 & 3).

    NATE is quickly becoming the standard certification for techs and most legit companies expect you to have NATE core and 1 specialty (from 21 or 22 i think?)

    Next question how do you get certified?

    Yes you could spend thousands to go to tech school in Florida or other schools around the country.

    Go to a local supply house, Johnstone supply, MSI, US airconditioning and ask what classes they offering. Many of them offer R410 cert, EPA 608 and NATE classes.

    Sign up to a local community college and see what classes/courses are available for HVAC. I think Palomar in San Marcos offered classes.

    Lastly Southern California Edison teamed up with an online hvac training company to give $1800 worth of free training. I don't know if you'll qualify or if its still available but here's the site.

    www.itsaboutq.net
    You cannot cheat an honest man. But that doesn't stop people trying!

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    NE Texas & Houston
    Posts
    57
    Everyone must have the EPA 608 Certification.
    Some companies want ICE Certification for 1 year entry level techs.
    Many want NATE for 2 year+ techs.
    RSES also has a certification.

    Certification doesn't mean you can function as a tech it just means you're smart enough to study and pass a test on the basics. I think all techs should be competent on the basics.

    Every state has different qualifications from nothing to NATE + 4 years experience. There are websites that list each state and the qualifications.

    The union programs are usually 4 year Certifications.

  3. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Teck323 View Post
    I was going to apply at a job but they said they need me to be "HVAC Certified". I'm pretty sure that's not the same as the Certification I got from my school for HVAC.

    So my question is, how does one receive this "HVAC Certified" status? Does it require an apprenticeship or experience in the field followed by some type of test to pass? Sorry kinda lost on this. Thanks in advance.

    Back to the original post. Hes not the one that specified California...It depends on the state, for example in Alaska there is ALOT you have to do. If your a service tech on heating systems and your only doing part for part replacement and not altering the design of a system you dont need anything. Service tech for A/C you need EPA 608. BUT...for forced air INSTALLS or altering a system you MUST be a state licensed sheetmetel apprentice (working under a journeyman) or journeyman (8000hrs.) working under a state licensed Mechanical Administrator (12000hrs.). For Hydronic (boilers, Waterheaters, ext.) Installs its the same requirements but plumber vs. sheetmetel. Up here NATE may help to set you apart but the high majority of techs dont have it because if your at the Journeyman level you have already expressed a level of knowledge above what the NATE exam expresses. Not saying the NATE exam isnt worth anything, just saying in comparison the test for the alaska Journeyman licenses are a bit harder. I would check with your state requirements by going to there professional licensing/ Contracor licensing site. In alaska its a $10,000 fine if your caught workinging without the proper licensing and id hate to see anyone get hit with that because they didnt know. But again visit your states site. Also check county and city requirements. In the municipality of Anchorage Alaska its the same requirement as the state so basically you need both a state license and city license. Ive never done HVAC outside of Alaska so Im not at all familure with other states requirements but from the sounds of it most of them are a bit easyer then up here. Kinda makes me want to move. haha.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    381
    The only, "HVAC Certified" I've ever seen are wallet cards handed out to students from a local trade school. This is actually funny to me because I don't believe there is such a thing. EPA, NATE, RSES certified, yes. HVAC certified, no...

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    381
    Just had a thought...maybe they mean the little card handed out by the state? In TX we have to be registered as a tech with the state.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Torrington CT
    Posts
    82
    up here in CT we have to go to school for 800 hrs as well as have apprentice hrs up to 8000 then take a test to get to be an S2 journeyman.
    but like they say it is up to each state

  7. #20
    If you want HVAC Certified So! you must that place where you learn about HVAC. They will help.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,954
    that particular company might want it out there but most are satisfied with the EPA cert and 6 to 9 months of school or field experience.google that and you will see it is mostly for contractors to get those certs.i know Trane up in City of Indusrtry was looking for apprentices with schooling and or actual 1-2 yrs in the field....great op for a young guy with energy try them..here in NYC you only need and EPA and FDNY burner/torch permit and a clean drivers license on all the companies.if they called for a HVAC licensing they would wipe out 50% of the techs.
    "when in doubt...jump it out" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1qEZHhJubY

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