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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga. burbs
    Posts
    281
    Hopefully, in about a month or so we will be moving out of the burbs of Atlanta, Ga. to our new house at the lake.

    Here goes the explanation of what I have to deal with:

    On the property is an old 40'x 20' foot pavillion that was once used for picnics, cook outs etc etc for a local company. However, the roofing shingles are curling up in short order. My guess is tbey are over 25 years old. Under the shingles there is tar paper and 1x6 inch boards from the top to bottom. I do think the old gal leaks in places it would just about have too.

    My first thought was to get a loader in and boom down she goes. But seems like a waste to do this and more stuff in the landfill. Also it might make a really good garage in part of the old gal if I can accomplish this feat.

    I would really like to get the old shingles and tar paper off and apprise the 1x6 decking. Replace what is bad and put down either OSB or plywood, tar paper, and new shingles.

    My big problem:
    Here is my dilemma and where you can give me your opinions. I really hate the thought of falling thru an old roof and getting hurt or worse. So how would you approach getting on this structure not knowing the integrity of what is up there? The bottom part of the roof inside is visible and I thought maybe I could somehow get a long wooden pole and tap on it first? Then again maybe this is flawed thinking as well. I am guess at the peak of the roof underneath it is about 20 feet to the concrete floor. Hard to test every single inch of an old structure 20 x 40 feet.

    Any thoughts on how to safely approach this mission? What would you do? If I can't salvage this old pavillion then I am going to have to build a bigger garage/workshop for me to hide from my wife in anyway.


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157
    We have a safety kit at work (i know you dont want to hear this) that includes a saftey harness , a 1" nylon rope that the harness hooks to

    Steel brackets attach to the Rafters and the rope attaches to the brackets , for fall protection


    other than that I would start removing the shingles with a shovel and determine the integrety of the roof as I removed the shingles..use a long handle flat shovel

    this is a comp roof isnt it?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,927
    scaffolds.start at the perimeter and replace with ply,then work your way up,removing and replacing the decking.Then you are ready for roofing...I like metal.
    Sometimes there are compounding complexities of multiple variables that are not intuitively obvious

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,642
    Originally posted by jacob perkins
    scaffolds.start at the perimeter and replace with ply,then work your way up,removing and replacing the decking.Then you are ready for roofing...I like metal.

    the right way to do it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    newton,mass.
    Posts
    6,109
    You could just send Robo up there, the conventions over and we dont need him anymore.

    Starting from the edge and working your way up is the best way. You dont have to replace the planks if you check them out and there ok. You may want to do more nailing as you go along. Where there is water damage the wood may look good but it could be punky, stick a knife in it and see how it does. But if you have the money and time and friends replace the wood planks with plywood. Dont buy beer until the jobs complete. Remember once you open up an old house or building anything can happen. Well good luck.
    "Nothing else can poison our culture, corrupt our society or ruin the character of our people like unearned money or unearned opportunity." -- James R. Cook

    "Fooling around with alternating current is just a waste of time. Nobody will use it, ever." Thomas Edison, 1889.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    66,803
    LOL...

    I wonder, if this was a carpenters site, would they say, this is not a DIY job, call a roofer.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    9,871

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,403
    Just another thing to consider. Make sure that the structure (truss's, walls etc) are strong enough to hold up the new roof, along with any loads up there.

    Would be a shame to redo it all and have it come crashing down for some reason.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    2,407
    OK now you are going to be West Seth Roofing and A/C.
    It isn't worth getting hurt if you don't know what you are doing, especially with the thought of a new house payment. Do the math and hirde a professional roofer. Maybe you can do a trade off with a local roofing company, they fix the roof at cost and you do some a/c repairs at cost in return. You know roofers, they usually damage a/c equipment on house jobs or need help on jobs where the a/c are on the roof. Just a thought.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    newton,mass.
    Posts
    6,109
    are you finished yet? hows it look? were you scared a little? Whats taking so long? Your never going to finish at this rate.
    "Nothing else can poison our culture, corrupt our society or ruin the character of our people like unearned money or unearned opportunity." -- James R. Cook

    "Fooling around with alternating current is just a waste of time. Nobody will use it, ever." Thomas Edison, 1889.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Waco, Texas, USA
    Posts
    6,153
    "And remember my sentimental friend......that a heart is not judged by how much you love, but by how much you are loved by others" - Wizard of Oz.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Bennington, Vermont U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,864
    Personally I won't walk a roof that is over a 12/5 pitch. My kids will walk a 12/6 but they are young.

    What is the pitch of the roof you are considering replacing? Look at the roof if it appears to sag then you may have a rotting problem and it is unsafe.

    If your subroof is that far gone that it is unsafe to walk on then you probably have damage to the rafters as well. You certainly don't want to put a new subroof on over rotten rafters.

    I like putting on roofs but it is a lot of work. Rent a conveyor to get your material onto the roof.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    12,077
    Tear it down, put it all in a pile and burn it up. On the slab, erect a brand spakin new garage. Building a garage from like a kit they sell at Home Depot, is a great starter project for thre beginner carpenter. You can't screw it up if your patient, take your time.

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