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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,035

    Confused

    Super heat, sub cooling, and Coil cleaning??

    Just finished up the computer part of class on super heat and sub cooling. Seems like every other page said to make sure condenser and evaporator coils are clean before taking pressure readings....dirty coils make for inaccurate readings...since so much emphasis was put on clean (cleaning ) coils before taking readings I wanted to ask those of you who actually are out there working???

    Do you all clean coils first or just do a visual and if coils look "ok" do the readings? Have you all noticed a problem with getting accurate super heat / sub cooling pressure readings with the coils you run into day in and day out at the average house?

    I'm sure cleaning coils is not free so do you itemize it on the bill and explain to the customer that you had to clean the coils before you could accurately trouble shoot the system or just include it as a cost of checking the system??
    73% of Americans say that illegal immigration is a problem. The other 27% say, "No habla inglis!"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157
    Dawg:

    If you do not have good air flow through the coils--If either one is dirty you will never have the proper superheat/subcooling , your pressures will be high. So sure if you go out to work on any unit you want to make sure the coils are clean and un obstructed and you have good air flow across the coils

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Bennington, Vermont U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,864
    Manufacturers design a system based on an average high temperature. If for instance the system is designed for 95F. The condenser coil is sized for that high temperature. What that means is that on a 95F day you have better have 100% of the condenser available to reject heat. If you don't then the evaporator will not be able to absorb as much heat as possible.

    Coils are made from expensive metals. The manufactures are not going to be nice guys and give us extra surface area just to be on the safe side. "Ah what the heck we just make the coil 10 or 20% bigger just incase it gets dirty."

    On a 95F day you need 100% of the coil. Blow it out with air or CO2. Best is to wash it with a high pressure hose.

    I have yelled at so many techs who have come back to the shop and said, "The coil looks clean."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Dothan, Al
    Posts
    3,453

    doglips

    No, I do not clean indoor coils before troubleshooting the system. The pressures and temps will tell you if the coil needs cleaning, or if there is low air flow for any reason. Coils can look dirty without actually affecting the operation of the system at that moment. I use the best coil cleaners I can find - foaming type - I only clean coils that need cleaning. Of course I am always looking after my customers money. ( why I am not a good business man, I guess ). So I want do anything that is an additional charge unless I feel that the system ( & their electric bill) would be benefitted by the charge.

    I do unto others exactly as I would do for myself,
    Richard

  5. #5
    You can no ttell if a coil is dirty by loking at it,

    Do I clean them before taking pressures ?

    No, I don' tknow if they need cleaned til I put my gauges on or feel around on the pipes, and if they need cleaned I set it up for the apprentice , I don't clean any coils but I do instruct others to clean them. I am pretty much beyond cleaning coils it is a task that it is below me.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    9,871

    BAWAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

    Originally posted by gruvn
    You can no ttell if a coil is dirty by loking at it,

    Do I clean them before taking pressures ?

    No, I don' tknow if they need cleaned til I put my gauges on or feel around on the pipes, and if they need cleaned I set it up for the apprentice , I don't clean any coils but I do instruct others to clean them. I am pretty much beyond cleaning coils it is a task that it is below me.
    You are such an IDIOTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    956
    Originally posted by gruvn
    You can no ttell if a coil is dirty by loking at it,

    Do I clean them before taking pressures ?

    No, I don' tknow if they need cleaned til I put my gauges on or feel around on the pipes, and if they need cleaned I set it up for the apprentice , I don't clean any coils but I do instruct others to clean them. I am pretty much beyond cleaning coils it is a task that it is below me.
    Gruvn, youre kidding right?
    Jokes, gotta be jokes

    I dont think there is any job below someone. you may not like it but to say its below you?

    I know some ppeople that rum multi million dollar companies but will still pick up the broom if they need to.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,069
    Some times I do a visual inpection first, other times I'll put the guages on, and then find out one or both coils need cleaned.

    Very very seldom have I ever cleaned one coil and not the other, if you clean one, clean them both.


    You can't over stress the importance of clean coils, but you can dwell on it too much.

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    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  9. #9
    Originally posted by operator
    Originally posted by gruvn
    You can no ttell if a coil is dirty by loking at it,

    Do I clean them before taking pressures ?

    No, I don' tknow if they need cleaned til I put my gauges on or feel around on the pipes, and if they need cleaned I set it up for the apprentice , I don't clean any coils but I do instruct others to clean them. I am pretty much beyond cleaning coils it is a task that it is below me.
    Gruvn, youre kidding right?
    Jokes, gotta be jokes

    I dont think there is any job below someone. you may not like it but to say its below you?

    I know some ppeople that rum multi million dollar companies but will still pick up the broom if they need to.
    I too know people like that , but I am not like them. If I say it is below me then it is below me. I have not cleaned a coil in 11 years and I will never clean another one. That is work for the learning apprentices , or as I like to call them "Monkey Boy"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    46
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by gruvn
    [B][QUOTE]Originally posted by operator
    Originally posted by gruvn




    I too know people like that , but I am not like them. If I say it is below me then it is below me. I have not cleaned a coil in 11 years and I will never clean another one. That is work for the learning apprentices , or as I like to call them "Monkey Boy"



    man u sound like your full of yourself of something else
    i would never work with of for a person such as your self
    gruvn......give servent leadership a try before someone puts a knot on your head...
    If its worth doing, it's worth doing right.

  11. #11
    Senior Tech Guest
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by gruvn
    Originally posted by operator
    Originally posted by gruvn
    You can no ttell if a coil is dirty by loking at it,

    Do I clean them before taking pressures ?

    No, I don' tknow if they need cleaned til I put my gauges on or feel around on the pipes, and if they need cleaned I set it up for the apprentice , I don't clean any coils but I do instruct others to clean them. I am pretty much beyond cleaning coils it is a task that it is below me.
    Gruvn, youre kidding right?
    Jokes, gotta be jokes

    I dont think there is any job below someone. you may not like it but to say its below you?

    I know some ppeople that rum multi million dollar companies but will still pick up the broom if they need to.
    I too know people like that , but I am not like them. If I say it is below me then it is below me. I have not cleaned a coil in 11 years and I will never clean another one. That is work for the learning apprentices , or as I like to call them "Monkey Boy"
    [/QUOT


    Boy...oh boy...fill my sparkling water while I sit under the umbrella and watch you do my dirty work...

    We have a name for you in the business...


























    Jerk!

  12. #12
    Hey I have earned it, These guys get paid well to clean coils, why should I do it. I get paid well to do what I do and cleaning coils is not part of my job.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,160

    Amen brother............

    you and me both...........by the way, who did you work for????????????????????

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