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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    894

    Any ERV experts here

    Trying to learn about the install I have coming up. RNC, house on slab, I am assuming the intake from outside will have to be a roof vent and the same for the exhaust.

    Ive read that some hook into the duct system and others just dump into living space ?

    Anybody ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    97
    If you want to distribute to the entire house, hooking to the duct is best. Just have to make sure to have control to the indoor blower.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    894
    Quote Originally Posted by D-Allen View Post
    If you want to distribute to the entire house, hooking to the duct is best. Just have to make sure to have control to the indoor blower.
    Does the erv have its own filter, Im thinking of just using a couple of 4 inch eave vents for the intake and discharge

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    97
    Yes, it has a crossover filter and most ERV's have 6" hookup. There have been instances when I just installed 2- 6" B-Vents out the roof to hook to.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    East Grand Forks, MN
    Posts
    1,373

    ERV

    Quote Originally Posted by Timber View Post
    Trying to learn about the install I have coming up. RNC, house on slab, I am assuming the intake from outside will have to be a roof vent and the same for the exhaust.

    Ive read that some hook into the duct system and others just dump into living space ?

    Anybody ?
    I try to stay away from penetrating roofs whenever possible. Is it possible for you?

    Are you using this for fresh air only or an exhaust system? With FA only, all you need is to pipe it in the Return Air, with an exhaust system you would need to vent from pick up points like bathrooms, kitchen and laundry locations etc...

    You can duct it into the heating/cooling system duct with either type.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    97
    The whole idea of using a ERV system is to recieve fresh air exchange without losing too much heating or cooling. (Energy Recovery Ventilator) It is designed to pull undesirable air from a space (return) and mix and filter fresh air (outside). The air coming in through the mixer can then be fed into your supply duct and the bad air exhausted outside.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    894
    I plan on keeping it seperate from the supply or return. I read some research where they tested 8 houses in Raleigh, and they determined this was the best way to install

    Honeywell ERV should be here next week.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Western MA
    Posts
    58
    I typically exhaust the bathrooms and duct the fresh air to the return side of the duct system. If you duct fresh air directly into the living space you can sometime get cool draft complaints. If bathroom fans are in or ducting the bathrooms isn't easy now, you can also install a central return for the stale air exhaust. We usually vent the intake and exhaust out the side wall and not the roof.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    894
    Quote Originally Posted by Josephs LLC View Post
    I typically exhaust the bathrooms and duct the fresh air to the return side of the duct system. If you duct fresh air directly into the living space you can sometime get cool draft complaints. If bathroom fans are in or ducting the bathrooms isn't easy now, you can also install a central return for the stale air exhaust. We usually vent the intake and exhaust out the side wall and not the roof.
    Joseph, I am doing a 12 x 12 central return to exaust the stale air. And I will tie in the incoming fresh air to the return.

    I am planning on just doing the fan interlock for control. This would just involve two wires from the furnace to the ERV ( green and common ) correct ?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Western MA
    Posts
    58
    Are you doing the central air system also? If so, you can install a honeywell thermostat with ventilation controls built in. It makes for a nicer installation and honeywell has some great control options.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    East Grand Forks, MN
    Posts
    1,373
    Quote Originally Posted by Timber View Post
    Joseph, I am doing a 12 x 12 central return to exaust the stale air. And I will tie in the incoming fresh air to the return.

    I am planning on just doing the fan interlock for control. This would just involve two wires from the furnace to the ERV ( green and common ) correct ?
    I usually involve three wires. Some ERV come with the terminals ready and some do not and you will be required to figured it out yourself. But you don't want to power the "G" terminal other then the stat otherwise AC unit will turn on!

    Like Joseph said, there are stats that have built in ventilation terminals, but cost more.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    894
    Quote Originally Posted by Josephs LLC View Post
    Are you doing the central air system also? If so, you can install a honeywell thermostat with ventilation controls built in. It makes for a nicer installation and honeywell has some great control options.
    Yes, this is the rough in for new resi. construction that I am doing. I would think it would be best to have the erv run only when the cetral air is running that way the incoming outdoor air will get conditioned thru the indoor air handler and coil or furnace depending on the season.

    ERV model : honeywell ER150C2004

    What does a honeywell iaq do diff. than a fan interlock ?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    894
    [QUOTE=arc8;10378172]I usually involve three wires. Some ERV come with the terminals ready and some do not and you will be required to figured it out yourself. But you don't want to power the "G" terminal other then the stat otherwise AC unit will turn on!

    Like Joseph said, there are stats that have built in ventilation terminals, but cost more.[/QUOTE

    honeywell ER150, installation manual, Figure 15, shows a fan interlock diagram tied into G on furnace and G on the stat. Wouldn't that work ok in heat and cool?

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