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  1. #1

    radiant heat for outside patio

    Guys, I'm a GC, not an HVAC guy. My customer has a covered 8 X 16 patio (no walls--it's open to the air) where he and his buddies smoke cigars on poker nights. The slab needs to be re-poured. Could we pack enough radiant heat in the new slab to generate some serious radiant heat for the cigar smokers (we're in southern New England)?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA
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    7,757
    Of course. Does this customer have a lot of money?
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    SE Pa
    Posts
    830
    Do they sit on the floor to play poker??
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    28
    what is nice is to have a concrete or tile bench and run the radiant in that so you have a warm seat to sit on.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    7,757
    Seriously, it will cost a bit of money to add radiant heat of any type to the new slab you are going to pour. And then you have to be concerned with warming up cement/concrete in cold weather to a warm temp and not get cracks. And on and on.

    It all can be done but it's going to cost a good bit of money.

    Are you considering electric radiant heat? Or hydronic heat? Each have their own associate expenses especially if the house does not have adequate electrical power to handle the new heaters or if their is no existing hot water boiler and/or one that is already at it's heating limit.
    "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers it can bribe the public with the public's own money.
    - Alexis de Toqueville, 1835

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    10
    Are they planning to smoke barefoot?

    Don't see how they would really feel the heat if they're outside.

  7. #7
    They do have a lot of money.

    I too am concerned about a stone cold slab cracking when the heat is turned on.

    Part of my question is whether it seems plausible that you could heat up a slab enough to make a real difference when the air temp. was, for example, 30 deg. F.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Powell River, BC, Canada
    Posts
    763
    It would be a lot more effective (and cheaper!) to install a couple of gas patio heaters or an infra-red radiant tube heater. Heating a slab works well inside, outside not so much.
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    7,757
    To me, the infa red heaters are the way to go.
    "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers it can bribe the public with the public's own money.
    - Alexis de Toqueville, 1835

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    I don't know
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    2,903
    Tell your customer to wear a frickin jacket while he gets his nicotine fix instead of attempting to heat the outdoors.
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
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    67,903
    Quote Originally Posted by freddytrout View Post
    They do have a lot of money.

    I too am concerned about a stone cold slab cracking when the heat is turned on.

    Part of my question is whether it seems plausible that you could heat up a slab enough to make a real difference when the air temp. was, for example, 30 deg. F.
    It can be done. But the cost to use it is prohibitive. The slab won't warm up in just a few minutes. So they would have to start heating the slab up possibly 2 days before they want to use the patio.
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Urbandale IA. USA
    Posts
    4,923
    I would recommend minimal floor radiant, THEN use radiant tube heat near the ceiling (if there is room).

    .
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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Pamnyra VA.
    Posts
    710
    I would use radiant for snow/ ice removal and infrared for comfort heating.Be sure to allow for drainage of melting snow.

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