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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Sacramento area
    Posts
    69

    Water Regulating Valve

    Water-regulating valves controlled by refrigerant head pressure are recommended to be installed in the supply water line to a condenser. I've seen several installed many years ago that are in the condenser leaving water line.

    What are some reasons for the recommended location as being in the supply line and not in the return line?
    I'm still learning this trade.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Winter Haven, FL
    Posts
    4,379
    They need to be in the outlet, not the inlet. Otherwise the water will just go down the drain.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Winter Haven, FL
    Posts
    4,379
    Let me clarify that thought.

    The water is held in the condenser by the reg valve. When the condensing temp rises, the valve opens up and let's fresh water in, by letting water flow out of the coil. If the valve were to be placed on the inlet, it would open up, and the water would simply flow through the coil and out to the drain. The coil temp would never be regulated.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    25
    Most water cooled units I see are always on the inlet side of the condenser. The only one that I can think of that regulates on the outlet side is Hoshi ice machines. I believe the said they use a little less water that way but I could be wrong.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    1,341
    I must agree most I have seen are on the inlet side of the condenser. I have seen them on the outlet but rarely.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    1,049
    If the regulating valve is placed on the supply water side, the out let line has to rise above the condenser, in effect, acting as a trap and allowing the condenser to stay full of water.

    One positive point to keeping the regulating valve on the inlet is the water pressure in the condenser will be at atmospheric pressure. If you have a rupture in the wall between the refrigerant/water, as the gas leaks out into the water, little or no water will enter the system. Eventually, all the gas will leak out and both the water side and refrigerant side will be at 0 psi.

    In the same scenario, with the regulating valve on the outlet side, when the system loses it's refrigerant charge, the coolant water, under line pressure will be forced into the system.

    This is not 100% black and white. It would depend on other factors such as, if the compressor is tripped or cycling on a LP control.

    Hoshizaki does install their regulating valves on the outlet of the condenser. And I have seen Hoshi machines squirting water out of the service valves.

    I would like the hear what others have to say.
    Experience is what you have an hour after you need it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Monmouth Junction-NJ-USA
    Posts
    6,004
    Methinks reading the IOM is a good idea. In a ton of years Hosi is the only one I have seen on the outlet.
    If you really know how it works, you have an execellent chance of fixin' er up!

    Tomorrow is promised to no one...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    307
    I have seen 1 or 2 inlet valves allow the water to completely drain from the condenser. This was on larger machines though, and I too have seen water coming from Schraeders on large outlet regulated water cooled condensers that blew a tube.

    So long as you stop the water from completely draining from the condenser, the inlet regulated valve setup is the way to go, IMHO
    Extended dehydration is the key

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    st.petersburg,fl
    Posts
    803

    Lightbulb

    You want the regulator on the outlet that way coil stays full water and has less fouling... Unless you like cleaning fouled condensers

    Hope this Helps....
    Isn't sanity just a one-trick pony anyway? I mean, all you get is that one trick, rational thinking, but when you're good and crazy, well, the sky's the limit!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,366
    According to Penn/Johnson Controls, the preferred method is to install the valve on the inlet to the condenser but if the condenser must be fully flooded it may be installed on the outlet side. This is an except from their installation instructions sheet:

    Flush water lines to clear any foreign matter that may
    interfere with valve operation. Mount valves vertically
    on the inlet side of the condenser with spring housing
    up. If it is necessary to keep the condenser flooded
    with coolant, the valve can be mounted on the outlet
    side. When mounting the valve in a position other than
    vertical, follow the instructions of the equipment in
    which the valve will be installed. Make refrigerant head
    pressure connection to bellows. If additional capillary
    tubing is required, use 1/4 in. O.D. tubing or larger.
    It make no difference to the valve operation, and as I see it, if the outlet of the condenser goes to atmospheric pressure, install the valve on the inlet side and simply pipe the outlet so the condenser isn't free-draining. Then, you keep the condenser flooded and at atmospheric pressure during the off-cycle.

    http://cgproducts.johnsoncontrols.co...c=284&req=v46*

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    st.petersburg,fl
    Posts
    803

    Lightbulb

    If the water level continues to rise and fall the water will leave deposits causing the condenser to foul, If you wish to prevent this then the regulator is installed on the outlet so you can maintain a flooded coil, as to the excerpt that Icemiester just posted...
    I've haven't had any issues and I alway install or move regulating valve to outlet... The ones on the inlet always seem to have issues...

    Hope this Helps...
    Isn't sanity just a one-trick pony anyway? I mean, all you get is that one trick, rational thinking, but when you're good and crazy, well, the sky's the limit!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Miami
    Posts
    258
    Mounting on the inlet tends to keep water hammer down. But then I'm using tower water so I have pressure on both lines. Still I generally see them on the inlet side, even on ice machines.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Sacramento area
    Posts
    69

    Thumbs up Thanks

    Thank you.

    Your responses have given me some ideas as to reasons for piping one way or the other. I've seen it done both ways, and was curious why some instructions state to install on the inlet with no further explanation.
    I'm still learning this trade.

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